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{ LINK: Vivir Latino: Tear Gas, Rocks, Rubber Bullets. Egypt? No, in the U.S. }

As we have been writing about, in Puerto Rico protests continue against rising fees in the university system but there are also protests against the violence being used against students and journalist attempting to do their jobs and cover the struggle.

Yesterday about 30 students were arrested during acts of civil disobedience carried out by the colonial Capitol Building. Originally students sought to present a plan whereby the Govt would allocate $50M from a surplus fund, eliminating the need for the $800 fees that sparked this latest round of protests. Riot police said they were forced to use tear gas because some of the hundreds of students that were protesting were throwing rocks.

(Source: onetinycorner, via atapestryofdisasters-deactivate)

{ Semana de la Xicana at UC Davis }

fuckyeahchicanopower:

If you’re in the Davis/Sacramento or even Bay area check out these events!

Semana de La Xicana

T U E S D A Y  2/22

“Health Workshop: Transitioning to UC Davis”

12-1pm, Garrison Room, Memorial Union

As a mujer moving away from our hometown to college can be overwhelming when trying to balance school, family, and a whole new environment at UC Davis. Profesora Yvette Flores will be presenting a psychological and Chicana/o Studies perspective of contemporary gender roles, family resilience and coping strategies.

“Regresando a nuestras raises”

Garrison Room, Memorial Union, 2pm-3pm,

An interactive workshop discussing natural health remedies, natural eating and natural beauty products and the politics behind the accessibility of natural products and environmental justice to Xicana/os.

Sex Workshop

5-7pm, Garrison Room, Memorial Union

A closed and safe space for Womyn-identified individuals to talk about our sexualities, what pleases us, what displeases us, emotional safety, and the connections between the mind, body, and spirit.

Performance Night: Featuring Felicia Montes.

1100 Social Science, 8:30pm

Come celebrate Xicana identity and watch students and community members poems, spoken word, songs/ lullabies, dances, art pieces etc…

If interested in performing or have any questions or concerns on the performance night, please contact, Sarah M. Hernández, smhernand@ucdavis.edu

Felicia is a Xicana Indigenous artist, activist, academic, community & event organizer, and poet & performer living and working in the Los Angeles area.  She believes art is a tool for education, empowerment and transformation and has translated her passion for art and social justice as the cofounder and coordinating member of two groundbreaking creative women’s collectives, Mujeres de Maiz and In Lak Ech.

For more info: http://feliciamontes.wordpress.com/

_________________________________________________________

W E D N E S D A Y  2/23

De Colores, 109 Olson, 11am-12pm,

A closed space for Queer Chicana/Latina Muxeres

Muxer Platica, Garrison Room, Memorial Union, 12pm-1pm

A closed space addressing Womyn’s issues in the Chicana/Latina community, 

Expresate! A space for self-exploration of the Xicana identity through art”

3201 Hart, 2pm-4pm, 

This workshop consists of two parts. First, we will utilize a “healing arts” therapy exercise to introspectively explore and share with one another our dynamic Xicana identities in a safe and confidential space.Please come to this space with an open mind, a readiness to look within and share, and a desire to get artsy!  

Intimate Partner Violence en la Comunidad Xicana

146 Olson, 5pm-7pm

Domestic violence can happen to anyone of any race, age, sexual orientation, religion, or gender. It can affect all individuals regardless of socioeconomic backgrounds, religion, sexual orientation, education levels, and it can happen to couples who are married, living together, or dating. Like all victims, Xicanas are at a high risk for domestic violence, but due to culturally specific needs, Xicanas face more barriers than non-Xicanas when dealing with intimate partner violence. This program is intended to share background on domestic violence among the Xicana community; programs/services that are currently involved in educating the larger community; and what we can do as individuals to help protect ourselves and loved ones from intimate partner violence.

Mujeres in Novelas

1116 Hart, 7-9pm

Film often reveals the collective consciousness of a society.  In Latin America and the Latina/o population in the United States, novelas are the most popular form of television entertainment.  Novelas are targeted towards a female audience and often feature a female protagonist.  Therefore, is important to be aware of the messages novelas portray about women.  The workshop will explore common female caricatures, feminist film theory, as well how novelas portray and reinforce gender roles, sexuality, and standards of beauty. 

_____________________________________________________________

T H U R S D A Y  2/24

“Learning How to Be a Spiritual Being in Higher Education”

Olson 105, 11am-12pm

Through this informal workshop, we hope to maintain and/ or regain the balance between our mind, body, and soul in order to nurture our spiritual beings. By using organic practices to reconnect with indigenismo, we hope to heal the mind that tends to overpower the other components for maintaining balance.

“Beyond the Bachelors: Mujeres in Higer, Higher Education” 

Garrison Room, Memorial Union, 12pm-2pm,

The objective of the workshop is to present statistics on higher education and motivate Chicanas, Latinas, and Indigenous womyn of the Americas to pursue schooling after their four years in Davis through inspiring testimonials and very specific information/tips/consejos that pertain to issues faced by Chicanas Latinas and Indigenous womyn of the americas in pursuit of a higher higher education. Questions about the application process, advice while an undergrad, and other information will be discussed.

¡Fuera con el Machismo!, Wellman 207,  4pm-5pm,

Male what? I can’t possibly be privileged for being a male, can I? Yes, come and learn about male privilege.   In keeping with this week’s theme we will also be discussing the history of machismo and its current state among the Chicana/o Latina/o community.

Activism Workshop, Garrison Room, Memorial Union, 5pm-7pm,

What does activism meant to you and our Xicana identity? This workshop will be a space to improve our skills, empower us, and get things done!

Panza Monologues, Kiebler 3, 7pm-9pm

Featuring: Virginia Grise

“The Panza Monologues is an original performance piece based on women’s stories about their panzas. Tu sabes - that roll of belly we all try to hide. Conceived from kitchen table conversations and chisme and compiled from interviews of Chicanas of all ages, places, and spaces, these stories create a quilt of poignancy, humor, and revelation. Performed in monologue format and riffing on Eve Ensler’s play The Vagina Monologues, The Panza Monologues boldly places the panza front and center as a symbol that reveals the lurking truths about women’s thoughts, lives, loves, abuses, and lived conditions.” UC Davis students, along with Virginia Grise, Xicana cultural worker- writer, performer, and author of Panza Monologues, will be performing to empower Xicanas about our panzas.

For more info: http://www.panzamonologues.com

___________________________________________________________

F R I D A Y  2/25

“Writing Through Your Voice: Healing through Self-Expressions and Narratives”,  2215 Hart Hall, 11:30am-1pm,

A writing workshop that will promote and provide a safe space for muxers to express themselves freely through writing. There will be writing exercises meant to help womyn own their voices either by providing them a space to read their work and receive feedback or nurture their writing on the spot. 

Film Screening: Real Women Have Curves

146 Olson, 1:30-3:30pm

Join us for a film screening and critical conversation around the film’s themes.

This coming-of-age movie revolves around Ana Garcia, a Chicana teenager living in an East Los Angeles barrio. While attending Beverly Hills High School, where she is an accomplished student, Ana works in her sister’s dress factory alongside her mother, Carmen, who considers this to be her younger daughter’s vocation. But Ana, encouraged by her teacher Mr. Guzman, has dreams of attending Columbia University. Ana must try to balance her mother’s traditional view of la mujer with her own contemporary ideas while dealing with self-image issues and exploring a new romantic relationship

Crafternoon

This week’s Crafternoon will be nipple pasties. Pasties are not just for a burlesquer. They are a perfect way to end a sexy striptease or to complete an outfit and even better, while lingerie companies charge an arm and a leg, you can make them yourself! Crafternoons is a weekly crafting and social event on Friday afternoons from 3:30-5pm at the LGBTRC ; supplies and abundant crafting knowledge provided, you bring the creativity. New craft projects taught each week, everyone is welcome!

LGBT Resource Center, University House Annex, 3-5PM

Activism 101 Part 2: Alumni Panel

Invited Alumni will come to campus to share on their experience during their time here on the UC Davis campus. They will share the reason for their involvement on campus, the challenges the community was facing at the time, and  what they are doing now. This will provide an opportunity for Alumn to pass on information, and acknowledge the importance of being active on campus. There will be time to ask quesitons as well. 

7pm-9pm, Location TBA

__________________________________________________________

S A T U R D A Y  2/26

Xicana Dance party, featuring DJ Purr

Location TBA

Come  have a good time, meet people and DANCE! Donations will be accepted and proceeds will go towards a scholarship for a Xicana undergraduate student.

*All events are free and open to everyone, except for workshops noted as closed spaces.

For campus map: http://campusmap.ucdavis.edu/

For questions or concerns please contact: lamuxer@gmail.com

If you can’t make it to the events, resources will be uploaded to: 

http://davisxicanas.blogspot.com/

{ Call for Resources. }

criptheatrequeer:

Hey all,

So. My university’s queer student group is aiming to put together a one-day conference for mid-March (the 18th, specifically). To this end, we are putting together a number of workshops. One of these, which my friend and I hope to co-facilitate, is on “Case Studies in Queer Campus Activism”.

So! For those of you who are at/have been at university! Or know people who fit that description! Does your university have a queer group? Has it engaged in political/activisty work? Was it successful?

I want to know all about it! If you would like to tell me all about it, please e-mail me at dorianisms [at] gmail [dot] com. And put in as much detail as you like, the more the better.

I LOVE YOU 

ETA: Also, feel free to reblog/distribute this widely! The more examples and the greater diversity of examples we have, the better!

(Source: hypotheticalthalamus, via the-artist-formerly-known-as-m-)

corruptpolitics:

robot-heart-politics:

Arizona Bill Could Close University Ob-Gyn Program

The bill, which is on its way to the state senate, says in part,

public monies or tax monies of this state or any political subdivision of this state or any federal funds passing through the state treasury or the treasury of any political subdivision of this state or monies paid by students as part of tuition or fees to a state university or a community college shall not be expended or allocated for training to perform abortions.

That means that not only can the University of Arizona and other state schools not use state money to train abortion providers — students can’t pay for that training themselves either, even if they want to. And according to State Rep. Matt Heinz, since the University of Arizona College of Medicine’s ob-gyn program would no longer be allowed to teach abortion, it would likely lose its accreditation (the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requiresabortion training). He told Cronkite News, “Two hundred residents who are currently actively training will actually have to leave. Their training will be forfeited and it will be like the program never existed.”

Wow.

i strongly dislike Jezebel and the cissexist/binarist language in the article (i.e. “uterus/vagina = woman”) but i’m reblogging to get the word out about this bill.

(Source: , via corruptpolitics-deactivated2011)

atchka:

theworldiseverlasting:

ivegotplaces:

 
hey you guys, something kind of intense.  my friend marizela is missing. 
Date Missing: March 5, 2011, 12:00-12:30 P.M.
Last Seen: Rainier Beach area, heading to UW Seattle campus to meet friends for lunch or study in the UW libraries
Possible Routes: Sound Link Light Rail stations, downtown/Chinatown areas, UW Seattle campus, U-district
Description – Asian female, 5’5” tall, 110 lbs, skinny build, asymmetrical bob with short bangs and brown/red highlights hairstyle, tattoo on left inner arm with the words ‘lahat ay magiging maayos’, last seen wearing denim jeans, light brown suede laced boots, possibly wearing green eye contacts, possibly carrying a plaid backpack with a Macbook Pro laptop, taking medication for depression
Please contact if you have any information regarding this person:
Edgar Perez (father): 609 – 646 – 0905
Jasmin Perez (mother): 609 – 742 – 2360
Melinda Mendoza (aunt/guardian): 206 – 760 – 1822
Joy Mendoza (cousin): 609 – 742 – 2336
if you could, please just reblog this to get the message out.  we all want her to be safe.  thanks guys.

it takes about two seconds to reblog this. that’s all. please just hit the reblog button so we can find her.

This is verifiably truth. Please reblog.

atchka:

theworldiseverlasting:

ivegotplaces:

 

hey you guys, something kind of intense.  my friend marizela is missing. 

Date Missing: March 5, 2011, 12:00-12:30 P.M.

Last Seen: Rainier Beach area, heading to UW Seattle campus to meet friends for lunch or study in the UW libraries

Possible Routes: Sound Link Light Rail stations, downtown/Chinatown areas, UW Seattle campus, U-district

Description – Asian female, 5’5” tall, 110 lbs, skinny build, asymmetrical bob with short bangs and brown/red highlights hairstyle, tattoo on left inner arm with the words ‘lahat ay magiging maayos’, last seen wearing denim jeans, light brown suede laced boots, possibly wearing green eye contacts, possibly carrying a plaid backpack with a Macbook Pro laptop, taking medication for depression

Please contact if you have any information regarding this person:

Edgar Perez (father): 609 – 646 – 0905

Jasmin Perez (mother): 609 – 742 – 2360

Melinda Mendoza (aunt/guardian): 206 – 760 – 1822

Joy Mendoza (cousin): 609 – 742 – 2336

if you could, please just reblog this to get the message out.  we all want her to be safe.  thanks guys.

it takes about two seconds to reblog this. that’s all. please just hit the reblog button so we can find her.

This is verifiably truth. Please reblog.

(via punlich)

{ LINK: Philosophy and Womens' Studies Get the Axe at UNLV }

newleft:

I think the vertical cuts demanded at UNLV that produced this move are characteristically neoliberal. Instead of across-the-board cutbacks for the sake of ostensibly temporary ‘belt-tightening,’ the assumption is probably that these permanent cuts will make the university a leaner, more efficient machine. Additionally, the immediate removal of tenured and untenured faculty alike is a way to reduce the collective bargaining power of the professors, and it sends a powerful message to faculty in other departments. The swift elimination of two subjects with (arguably) the greatest ability to think critically about life and society does not bode well for universities elsewhere in the United States.

oshit.  followers, please reblog and email the people listed at the link if you can — this is fucking terrible.

(via kadalkavithaigal)

dancingonembers:

knowthe(source): In Response to “Asians in the Library”

knowthesaurus:

Please reblog as a form of solidarity.

In Response to “Asians in the Library”

From the Asian Pacific Coalition at UCLA

On Sunday, March 13th, an alarming video was re-posted on YouTube from the Facebook account of a UCLA student. The video, titled “Asians in the Library”, chronicled the student’s racist tirade against the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities at UCLA. Within hours, the video re-posted on various forms of social media, where members of the community viewed and responded to the video. The resulting reaction reveals an alarmingly dangerous campus climate and an underlying current of racism and prejudice still vibrantly alive in America. The Asian Pacific Coalition and API communities at UCLA would like to issue the following response:

In her public comment to the UCLA community, Alexandra Wallace expressed her concern about the “hordes of Asian people that UCLA accepts into our school every year.” On a campus that boasts a student population of 40% Asian Americans and Pacific Islander communities (API), Wallace’s comments are both insensitive and revelatory of the flawed mainstream perception of the API community. Many view API’s as a uniform aggregate, thereby failing to acknowledge the diversity within the API community and perpetuating the view of API’s as the model minority and the foreign “they” who unfairly get accepted into “our” school. Wallace perpetuates the “us” versus “them” rhetoric in her comments, thereby expressing distaste in API’s and an even greater anxiety that “foreigners” are taking over UCLA.

However, she claims, it would not bother her so much that “hordes of Asian people got into our school” if they would start learning to “use American manners.” Her comment stems from the supposed phone conversations she overheard whilst studying in the UCLA library, citing one particular conversation in the following phrases, “OOo, ching chong, ling long, ting ta.” Among these phrases, “ching chong” stands out as an ethnic slur considered derogatory due to its historical usage in negatively depicting Chinese speech patterns [1]. While some argue that “ching chong” is a phrase we should regard with desensitization now that decades lie between us and the Chinese Exclusion Act, its constant resurfacing tells us otherwise. API’s today are viewed as the legacy of the “yellow peril”: if we are not taking over railroad jobs in the 1860’s or taking over auto industry jobs in the 1980’s, we are now supposedly taking over coveted spots at universities like UCLA. The use of such a blatantly ethnic slur portrays API’s as the perpetual foreigner, undeserving of an opportunity to study next to “Americans” in the UCLA library.

Her remarks do not simply address the students at UCLA, but she extends her call for American mannerisms to the brothers, sisters, mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles, and grandparents of API students, whom “swarm” the apartments every weekend to cook and clean and stop API students from learning to “fend for themselves.” Why should the involvement of family in a student’s life be considered with such disdain? Why do the experiences of a few API students become generalized as the experience of every API student? Above all, why is there an assumption that Asian Americans do not know how to fend for themselves?

Furthermore, her ignorant comments extend to the tragedy currently affecting Japan following the tsunami.

Her decision to state such culturally insensitive remarks via a forum as public as a Facebook video is disturbing. What gives her the audacity to record such a video? Perhaps she did not expect anyone to react. Perhaps she did not expect API’s to fend for themselves.

Well think again. We are responding, and by the numbers.

As evidenced by the responses of outrage and hurt from our community, it is clear that this student’s comments can be considered a hate speech, an act of discrimination, harassment, and profiling.

However, we must address the many ignorant comments stemming from our own community in reaction to Wallace’s comments. While we condemn this student’s remarks as not only ignorant and offensive but hateful as well, we believe that we as a community can do better than to resort to the student’s tactics of throwing out divisive words which only perpetuate a culture of racism and sexism on both sides.

We will not use our strength as a community to attack this individual but rather we will use this event to grasp at an understanding of campus climate: despite what you may have believed about UCLA or our universities before, it is clear that racism, sexism, bigotry, and hatred still exist.

As a community, we should respond with the grace, sensitivity and civility afforded us through the manners we learned from our parents, and their parents before them.

Hence, as a community, we demand the following:

1) We call for a public apology from Alexandra Wallace. Her words and actions are not in line with the UCLA Student Code of Conduct which states:

“The University strives to create an environment that fosters the values of mutual respect and tolerance and is free from discrimination based on race, ethnicity, sex, religion, sexual orientation, disability, age, and other personal characteristics.”[2]

2) We call for UCLA to take the appropriate disciplinary measures befitting of Wallace’s violation against the UCLA Student Code of Conduct and UCLA’s Principle of Community, which states:

“We do not tolerate acts of discrimination, harassment, profiling or other harm to individuals on the basis of expression of race, color, ethnicity, gender, age, disability, religious beliefs, political preference, sexual orientation, gender identity, citizenship, or national origin among other personal characteristics. Such acts are in violation of UCLA’s Principles of Community and subject to sanctions according to campus policies governing the conduct of students, staff and faculty.” [3]

3) We call for UCLA to issue a statement addressing this incident. UCLA must demonstrate its commitment to a culture of diversity, respect, tolerance, and acceptance for all communities by standing against such acts.

4) We call for the UCLA Academic Senate to pass a requirement in the general education curriculum grounded in the UCLA Principles of Community.

As students at UCLA, here is how you can help voice your concerns:

1) Email Chancellor Gene Block (chancellor@ucla.edu) and Assistant Vice Chancellor Robert J. Naples (rnaples@saonet.ucla.edu) to report this matter as a violation of Student Conduct.

2) Post a message on Chancellor Block’s Facebook page expressing your concern:http://www.facebook.com/uclachancellor

3) Allow this event to help us bare in mind the continual relevance of ethnic studies at UCLA and beyond. While ethnic studies programs are crumbling at CSULA and struggling for a place at UCSC, let us remember why it is important now more than ever to continue to support the development, sustainability and growth of ethnic studies.

Let this incite an honest discussion on what it truly means to be a community founded upon mutual respect. Do not turn this into a riot. Do not turn this into an attack. We are better than that. Allow us to come together in solidarity and address the matter where it truly stems: as a reflection of the gross misunderstanding of our communities and the hatred which grows from it.

[1] http://www.websters-online-dictionary.org/definitions/Ching+Chong?cx=partner-pub-0939450753529744%3Av0qd01-tdlq&cof=FORID%3A9&ie=UTF-8&q=Ching+Chong&sa=Search#906

[2]
http://www.registrar.ucla.edu/catalog/catalog10-11-827d.htm

[3] 
http://www.diversity.ucla.edu/strategicplan/docs/Principles_of_Community.pdf

(via tranzient)

{ LINK: There's a petition for Abdirashid Dahir. }

juthikalalala:

This is what happened. Please reblog and sign.

holy shit systemic bigotry (and individual bigotry too i guess?)

i have no fucking words for this

(via juthikaforpresident-deactivated)

{ Dear Angry White Men With Kids Of College Age }

squee-gee:wtfox-:

Here’s a radical idea: Instead of blaming minorities for having the gall to, oh my god, want to go to college and have a chance at the positions and money you clearly feel your kids are entitled to, how about you try this:

1.) Oppose budget cuts to state-funded universities. Really. Almost every state has one, if not two (or more), Tier 1 universities with international reputations for education and research. When states cut university budgets, they’re making it materially more difficult for all students, including yours, to access institutions that are, by their very definition, public. (Coincidentally, they also make it difficult for those schools to continue producing the research that attracts external funding, by making it harder to hire new permanent faculty, acquire new equipment, etc.) So the next time the Republican representative you elected decides it would be awesome to gut public university funding, get together with your friends and go oppose it.

2.) Demand investigations into questionable relationships between college financial aid departments and loan companies. This has already been done in New York, but it couldn’t hurt to push for laws that require full disclosure as to the relationships between FA departments and the lending institutions they use. This will help you (and your kid) avoid being pushed into taking out loans that are not in your financial best interest.

3.) While you’re at it, why don’t you help all of us—educators, students, concerned parents—fight against university bureaucracies that have helped push tuition and fees well beyond viable affordability for all families? Demand financial accountability from your kid’s prospective school.

4.) In the meantime, sit down with The Big Book O’ Scholarships or its electronic equivalent and go through it. There will be something for your kid. Sure, it may not be Scholarship Intended Only For My Child And No One Else’s, Especially If They’re Black, and it may not be a full ride at an Ivy, but it’ll be something… and that is far, far more than many families—whose kids don’t have access to anywhere near the resources your kids do—will have.

Oh, and until you’re ready to say anything other than “It’s not fair black/Latino/Asian kids get money and my perfect kid does not because he’s white”… my special today is poached Sit Down And Shut The Fuck Up.

So much THIS.

(via so-treu)

[image: photo of Marizela Perez (description of her appearance below), taken in front of a mirror she’s turned away from to show off the back of her asymmetrical bob haircut.  she’s wearing a black t-shirt and silver necklace and is smiling.]
itsgoingtoworkout:

hey you guys, something kind of intense.  my friend marizela is missing. 
Date Missing: March 5, 2011, 12:00-12:30 P.M.
Last Seen: Rainier Beach area, heading to UW Seattle campus to meet friends for lunch or study in the UW libraries
Possible Routes: Sound Link Light Rail stations, downtown/Chinatown areas, UW Seattle campus, U-district
Description – Asian female, 5’5” tall, 110 lbs, skinny build, asymmetrical bob with short bangs and brown/red highlights hairstyle, tattoo on left inner arm with the words ‘lahat ay magiging maayos’, last seen wearing denim jeans, light brown suede laced boots, possibly wearing green eye contacts, possibly carrying a plaid backpack with a Macbook Pro laptop, taking medication for depression
Please contact if you have any information regarding this person:
Edgar Perez (father): 609 – 646 – 0905
Jasmin Perez (mother): 609 – 742 – 2360
Melinda Mendoza (aunt/guardian): 206 – 760 – 1822
Joy Mendoza (cousin): 609 – 742 – 2336

additional info (courtesy of atchka).  she is still missing AFAIK, please pass this around.

[image: photo of Marizela Perez (description of her appearance below), taken in front of a mirror she’s turned away from to show off the back of her asymmetrical bob haircut.  she’s wearing a black t-shirt and silver necklace and is smiling.]

itsgoingtoworkout:

hey you guys, something kind of intense.  my friend marizela is missing. 

Date Missing: March 5, 2011, 12:00-12:30 P.M.

Last Seen: Rainier Beach area, heading to UW Seattle campus to meet friends for lunch or study in the UW libraries

Possible Routes: Sound Link Light Rail stations, downtown/Chinatown areas, UW Seattle campus, U-district

Description – Asian female, 5’5” tall, 110 lbs, skinny build, asymmetrical bob with short bangs and brown/red highlights hairstyle, tattoo on left inner arm with the words ‘lahat ay magiging maayos’, last seen wearing denim jeans, light brown suede laced boots, possibly wearing green eye contacts, possibly carrying a plaid backpack with a Macbook Pro laptop, taking medication for depression

Please contact if you have any information regarding this person:

Edgar Perez (father): 609 – 646 – 0905

Jasmin Perez (mother): 609 – 742 – 2360

Melinda Mendoza (aunt/guardian): 206 – 760 – 1822

Joy Mendoza (cousin): 609 – 742 – 2336

additional info (courtesy of atchka).  she is still missing AFAIK, please pass this around.

(via imtireds0letmebebr0ken)