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radicallyhottoff:

من مظاهرات يوم الغضب - شاب مصري مقابل مدرعة (via freeegypt)

as many of you may have heard, there are protests going on in Egypt that are connected to the protests going on in Tunisia. 

This is video of one of those protests—where a group of protestors stand up to an armored police vehicle…

(via bigbadcolored-deactivated201104)

{ LINK: Egypt protesters set fire to government building in Suez }

firesandwords:


   

ISMAILIA, Egypt | Wed Jan 26, 2011 2:44pm EST

(Reuters) - Protesters in Suez set a government building on fire and tried to burn down a local office of Egypt’s ruling party late on Wednesday, security sources and witnesses said.

 

Protesters threw petrol bombs at the National Democratic Party office but failed to set it alight. Police fired teargas to push the demonstrators back, they said.

 

Officials in the city in Egypt’s northeast ordered that shops be closed after incidents of looting were reported. Clashes with police left some 55 people injured, according to Reuters witnesses.

 

(Reporting by Yusri Mohamed; editing by Alastair Macdonald)

akio:

brycedotvc:

The video above is less than a minute long. Please take a moment to watch it.

I’ll wait.

Did you see it? Sure there is much to the revolution unfolding in Egypt, but that’s not the revolution I’m highlighting here. 

In the video you’ll notice the events of the day are not getting captured by film crews and news reporters. They’re being documented by people with their mobile phones. Take another look at the video and count the number of illuminated mobile phone screens you see being raised overhead to capture pictures and video as the scenes in the streets unfolds.

I’m as guilty as anyone else for being overly enthused with investment opportunities as the world goes increasingly more mobile. But, in the case above, we’re not talking about some Stanford dropouts who’ve developed a hot new iPhone app. We’re seeing something much more fundamental. Not just a shift from the PC to handsets, but a shift from disconnected and isolated members of developing nations to connected global citizens. Many of whom skipped the PC altogether.

I had a conversation last week, that’s still rattling around in my head, which was both troubling and inspiring. In it my friend pointed out that people in the developing world have mobile phones before they have clean water or toilets. Indeed, India has over 500 million mobile subscribers while less than 400 million Indians have access to toilets.

By their nature, these phones were born social. They were built from the ground up to connect us. First with voice, then with text. Now, they’re packed capabilities like photos, videos and a wave of native and web applications. We’re just beginning to catch a glimpse of what a powerful and disruptive force they can be. Not just to incubent handset manufactures and telcos but to social movements and government regimes. 

I’ve made clear my belief that we’re in the midst of a massive global reinvention. Not just a shift from analog to digital, but a shift from centralized control to distributed systems. From isolated single user experiences to a global social fabric. These mobile devices are the of Gutenberg presses of our generation. This is not a bubble, this is a revolution. 

How to design and test, and pick best mid-level platforms - for ‘several’ ppl - either researcher/engineers or problem-solvers of any kind - or family/classroom - 

between (both extreme of) 1 person and mob/mass/6 billions

is the challenge. (Computers didn’t start as PC.) 

We’ve been skipping that challenge for a long time. 

(via guerrillamamamedicine)

“Two of the major factors that are fueling the protests in the Middle East and North Africa are poverty and corruption. The people protesting want more economic opportunity and don’t like the fact that the ones in power are the only ones making money with bribes and graft. The protests have spread into Egypt and what is happening in that country has really caught the attention of the west. Overnight, four protesters died as the police started to use force against the people. From IC Scotland, we read more about the protesting that turned deadly. The two protesters were killed during a demonstration in the city of Suez. The official said one of them had respiratory problems and died as a result of tear gas inhalation and the other was killed by a rock thrown during the protest. The policeman died during the protest in Cairo. The official said he was hit in the head by a rock. … Throughout the day, police blasted crowds with water cannons and set upon them with batons and acrid clouds of tear gas in an attempt to clear demonstrators crying out “Down with Mubarak” and demanding an end to Egypt’s grinding poverty, corruption, unemployment and police abuses. Tuesday’s demonstration, the largest Egypt has seen for years, began peacefully, with police showing unusual restraint in what appeared to be a calculated strategy by the government to avoid further sullying the image of a security apparatus widely criticised as corrupt and violent. With discontent growing over economic woes, and the toppling of Tunisia’s president still resonating in the region, Egypt’s government - which normally responds with swift retribution to any dissent - needed to tread carefully.”

Poverty News Blog: Four people killed in Egypt protests (via guerrillamamamedicine)

(via mytongueisforked)

guerrillamamamedicine:

YouTube - Chasing the Egyptian riot police

{ SF Bay Area Folks: }

jadedhippy:

Got this in my email today:

PLEASE CIRCULATE WIDELY

Sat. Jan. 29, 12noon, Market & Montgomery Sts., SF
Emergency Demonstration in Solidarity with Egyptian People

Down with Mubarak – Stop the Repression!
End U.S. Aid to the Mubarak Regime!
Victory to the Egyptian People!

Following the popular revolt that overthrew the U.S.-allied dictatorship in Tunisia, the Egyptian people have taken to the streets in the hundreds of thousands demanding the fall of another U.S. client dictator, Hosni Mubarak. The U.S. gives $1.3 billion per year in “security aid” to Egypt, second only to Israel as the largest recipient of U.S. aid. That “security aid” has been used to buy the tear gas and other weapons and equipment that are killing Egyptian people attempting to exercise their right to protest and speak out.

Many organizations including the ANSWER Coalition will be participating in the Jan. 29 emergency demonstration.

Click here to see a video of the protest held on Wed., Jan. 26 in SF, which was called on just a few hours notice.

A.N.S.W.E.R. Coalition
http://www.AnswerCoalition.org
http://www.AnswerSF.org
Answer@AnswerSF.org
2969 Mission St.
415-821-6545

(via punwitch)

lucypaw:

genderbitch:

thenoobyorker:

thenoobyorker:

This is an image of the tear gas canisters that were being fired at Egyptian protesters. It is an image that is being widely circulated across the web by the Arab community. Contrary to popular domestic belief, some things are still made in the U.S.A.
Furthermore, these were some of the chants in Egypt:

يا مبارك, يا مبارك. الطيّارة في إنتظاركO Mubarak, O Mubarak  The plane is waiting for you.
الشعب يريد إسقاط النظامThe people want the downfall of the regime
يا مبارك, يا مبارك.  السعوديّة بإتنظاركO Mubarak.  O Mubarak.  Saudi Arabia is waiting for you.

Unfortunately Egypt is not Tunisia, Mubarak will not go down without a fight. This could get nasty.

White  House spokesman Robert Gibbs said on Thursday the United States  believes the Egyptian government is stable despite massive street  protests against it. (via pantslessprogressive)
Stability is made in the U.S.A.

The United States exports suffering, death, ruin, genocide, oppression and all the tools necessary to DIY.

The United States continuing support of dictators is disgusting.  But then the US is not an exceptional country nor does it claim to be all about freedom.  Oh, wait.

lucypaw:

genderbitch:

thenoobyorker:

thenoobyorker:

This is an image of the tear gas canisters that were being fired at Egyptian protesters. It is an image that is being widely circulated across the web by the Arab community. Contrary to popular domestic belief, some things are still made in the U.S.A.

Furthermore, these were some of the chants in Egypt:


يا مبارك, يا مبارك. الطيّارة في إنتظارك
O Mubarak, O Mubarak  The plane is waiting for you.

الشعب يريد إسقاط النظام
The people want the downfall of the regime

يا مبارك, يا مبارك.  السعوديّة بإتنظارك
O Mubarak.  O Mubarak.  Saudi Arabia is waiting for you.

Unfortunately Egypt is not Tunisia, Mubarak will not go down without a fight. This could get nasty.

White House spokesman Robert Gibbs said on Thursday the United States believes the Egyptian government is stable despite massive street protests against it. (via pantslessprogressive)

Stability is made in the U.S.A.

The United States exports suffering, death, ruin, genocide, oppression and all the tools necessary to DIY.

The United States continuing support of dictators is disgusting.  But then the US is not an exceptional country nor does it claim to be all about freedom.  Oh, wait.

(Source: genericlatino)

porygon2:

metaconscious:

Complete Internet Blackout in Egypt
By Curt Hopkins / January 27, 2011 3:45 PM 
 After blocking Twitter on Tuesday and, intermittently, Facebook and Google on Wednesday, the Egyptian government has upped the ante, throwing a complete Internet access block across the whole of the country. Additionally blocked are Blackberry service and SMS.
Reports are pouring in, many to Twitterers via landline, that the country has been “cut off” and is now a “black hole.”
Reports from Cairo, Alexandria and elsewhere in the country indicate the block is wholesale and countrywide.
CNN’s Ben Wedeman commented, “No internet, no SMS, what is next? Mobile phones and land lines? So much for stability” and asked “Will #Egypt totally cut communications with the outside world?”
That depends, I think, on whether the idea now is to disrupt communications between groups of protesters or to lay a blackout curtain across Egypt to mask a total crackdown. As many as eight protesters, three in Cairo and five in Suez, have been killed, along with one policeman. I think if landlines and mobile go, the question must become, is the Egyptian government planning a wholesale massacre? (AP has raw footage of security forces converging, then killing a protester. Please be warned. This is some vicious shit.)
Those in and outside of Egypt have pledged to keep as much in connection to one another using whichever avenues remain. This is one of those times, however, in which the presence of functioning traditional journalists will pick up from the citizens who had been reporting on the ground.
via ReadWriteWeb

[image: a protestor holding up a sign in front of a line of riot police.]

porygon2:

metaconscious:

Complete Internet Blackout in Egypt

By Curt Hopkins / January 27, 2011 3:45 PM 

 After blocking Twitter on Tuesday and, intermittently, Facebook and Google on Wednesday, the Egyptian government has upped the ante, throwing a complete Internet access block across the whole of the country. Additionally blocked are Blackberry service and SMS.

Reports are pouring in, many to Twitterers via landline, that the country has been “cut off” and is now a “black hole.”

Reports from Cairo, Alexandria and elsewhere in the country indicate the block is wholesale and countrywide.

CNN’s Ben Wedeman commented, “No internet, no SMS, what is next? Mobile phones and land lines? So much for stability” and asked “Will #Egypt totally cut communications with the outside world?”

That depends, I think, on whether the idea now is to disrupt communications between groups of protesters or to lay a blackout curtain across Egypt to mask a total crackdown. As many as eight protesters, three in Cairo and five in Suez, have been killed, along with one policeman. I think if landlines and mobile go, the question must become, is the Egyptian government planning a wholesale massacre? (AP has raw footage of security forces converging, then killing a protester. Please be warned. This is some vicious shit.)

Those in and outside of Egypt have pledged to keep as much in connection to one another using whichever avenues remain. This is one of those times, however, in which the presence of functioning traditional journalists will pick up from the citizens who had been reporting on the ground.

via ReadWriteWeb

[image: a protestor holding up a sign in front of a line of riot police.]

(Source: metaconscious, via tranzient-deactivated20110219-d)

{ What’s Happening in Egypt Explained. (UPDATED) }

promotingpeace:

The basics: Egypt is a large, mostly Arab, mostly Muslim country. At around 80 million people, it has the largest population in the Middle East and the third-largest in Africa. Most of Egypt is in North Africa, although the part of the country that borders Israel, the Sinai peninsula, is in Asia. Its other neighbors are Sudan (to the South), Libya (to the West), and Saudi Arabia (across the Gulf of Aqaba to the East). It has been ruled by Hosni Mubarak since 1981. 

What’s happening? Inspired by the recent protests that led to the fall of the Tunisian government and the ousting of longtime Tunisian dictator Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, Egyptians have joined other protesters across the Arab world (in Algeria, notably) in protesting their autocratic governments, high levels of corruption, and grinding poverty. In Egypt, tens of thousands of protesters have taken to the streets. Here’s a photo of one of the protests in Cairo, the capital (via Twitter):

Why are Egyptians unhappy? They have basically no more freedom than Tunisians. Egypt is ranked 138th of 167 countries on The Economist’s Democracy index, a widely accepted measure of political freedom. That ranking puts Egypt just seven spots ahead of Tunisia. And Egyptians are significantly poorer than their cousins to the west. 

How did this all start? This particular round of protests started with the protests in Tunisia. But like their Tunisian counterparts, Egyptian protesters have pointed to a specific incident as inspiration for the unrest. Many have cited the June 2010 beating death of Khaled Said (warning: graphic photos), allegedly at the hands of police, as motivation for their rage. But it’s also clear that the issues here are larger.

Why is this more complicated for the US than Tunisia was? The Tunisian regime was a key ally for the US in the fight against Al Qaeda. But the US government’s ties to Tunisia’s Ben Ali pale in comparison to American ties to Egypt. Shadi Hamid of the Brookings Institution, a centrist think tank, explains

Predictions that a Tunisia-like uprising will soon topple Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak are premature—the Egyptian regime, with its well-paid military, is likely to be more unified and more ruthless than its Tunisian counterparts were… The U.S. is the primary benefactor of the Egyptian regime, which, in turn, has reliably supported American regional priorities. After Iraq, Afghanistan, and Israel, Egypt is the largest recipient of U.S. assistance, including $1.3 billion in annual military aid. In other words, if the army ever decides to shoot into a crowd of unarmed protestors, it will be shooting with hardware provided by the United States. As Steven Cook of the Council on Foreign Relations points out, the Egyptian military is “not there to project power, but to protect the regime.” [Emphasis added.]

Looking for live video? You can watch Al Jazeera English live on the web. Better, perhaps, is the video feed from cairowitness, who has set up a webcam downtown in Cairo, Egypt’s bustling capital.

What’s the latest?

UPDATE: This video of a “Tiananmen Square moment” is being widely circulated on Twitter: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YtTUsqra-MU&feature=player_embedded

UPDATE 10, 11:45 a.m. EST Thursday: Lots of news to round up from today. The big takeaway, though, is that the protests continue. Tomorrow may be a major day of reckoning: protest organizers have called for huge demonstrations (expected to be the largest since Tuesday), and if protests happen as people leave Friday prayers at Egypt’s 90,000+ mosques, the regime could be in real trouble. Anyway, here’s some of what you should know about:

UPDATE 11, Thursday 6:15 p.m. EST: Arabist just posted a claim that Egypt has “shut off the internet” entirely. I don’t know how seriously to take this, but Arabist is a generally reliable site and a full shutdown is something that is theoretically possible. Arabist also notes the alleged shutdown happened “just after AP TV posted a video of a man being shot.” If the shutdown is real, it’s a huge sign that the regime is very, very worried about the protests scheduled for tomorrow (well, today Egyptian time). As Sultan Al Qassemi says, “the Egyptian regime seems willing to do anything to stay in power, including plunging Egypt back into the dark ages if necessary.” UPDATE TO THE UPDATE: Arabist notes that “it’s not everywhere,” and that a foreign journalist working at a hotel in Cairo has reported to them that he still has internet access.

UPDATE 12, Thursday 6:45 p.m. EST: The Arabist report that the internet is down throughout Egypt (see previous update) is looking increasingly well-founded. Alec Ross, a State Department spokesman, has tweeted in Arabic that the US “call[s] upon the Egyptian gov to allow unrestricted access to the internet & peaceful protests.” In addition, Arabist’s Issandr El Amrani (follow him! @arabisthas “confirmation from a person in a position to know at one Egypt’s mobile phone operators that the phone companies have been ordered by the authorities to shut down SMS services (which has been the case for at least an hour) and Blackberry Messenging in Cairo (and perhaps elsewhere in Egypt).” 

UPDATE 13, Thursday 7:15 p.m. EST: Associated Press: “A major service provider for Egypt, Italy-based Seabone, reported early Friday that there was no Internet traffic going into or out of the country after 12:30 a.m. local time.” 12:30 a.m. in Egypt is 5:30 p.m. the day before EST, so that fits with our timeline and the Arabist report.

(via tranzient-deactivated20110219-d)

{ al jazeera is reporting that the NDP headquarters in Egypt are on fire…the NDP is the ruling party… }

(via bigbadcolored-deactivated201104)