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{ LINK: tiny fists of rage. feel them.: oh hell no Nick Kristof you didn't }

tinyfist:

Just in case anyone is ever tempted, ever again, to praise Nick Kristof for being so heroic and chronicling the Arab Revolutions, check out his column today. It’s dedicated to examining why the Middle East is so “backward”.

I am not making this up.

It’s fundamentally flawed from conception, of course. BACKWARD? Really? But its text gets worse (which I didn’t think possible). Apparently the Middle East (and/or Muslim societies; Kristof doesn’t seem to remember there are MANY such societies outside of the Middle East) is inimical to capitalism because of Koranic laws on usury.

…yeah. Never mind that interest isn’t inherent to capitalism in any of its phases except, um. This one.

But! Read on! Kristof also writes, and fuck it hurts to C&P this:

Many Arabs have an alternative theory about the reason for the region’s backwardness: Western colonialism. But that seems equally specious and has the sequencing wrong.

There are no words. He swiftly and categorically trashes any and all responsibility and complicity in uneven global development. This in itself is not surprising; nor is it surprising that in absolving the West, he puts the blame back on the region and its people and their “psychology” — that an entire heterogeneous group, from single mothers in Morocco to digital dicks like Wael Ghonim to the royal house of Saud, can be conceived of as having a common psychology is racism in its purest form — blame for a condition that does not actually exist. “Backwardness” is itself an a priori hideously warped construction.

The New York Times ought to be ashamed to publish racist, ignorant drivel, but instead, Kristof is one of their leading lights. Kristof is worse than a joke (which his compadre Thomas Friedman is). He’s worse than the embodied voice of USAmerican power and imperialism. He’s a dangerous, toxic asshole with a platform, Glenn Beck with nicer friends. A “journalist” who doesn’t bother to understand anything about the context or the contents of the events he’s covering is no journalist at all; he’s certainly no one who should be listened to.

He’s just your everyday apologist for imperialism and suffering.

(via dancingonembers-deactivated2011)

{ LINK: MARCH AND RALLY FOR CLEMENCY FOR LEONARD PELTIER May 21, 2011 }

PLEASE CIRCULATE if possible.  and there is a list of needs if you scroll down.  thank you.

THE NEW NORTHWEST LEONARD PELTIER CLEMENCY CAMPAIGN

As individual fingers we can easily be broken, but all together we make a mighty fist. — Sitting Bull

REGIONAL MARCH AND RALLY FOR CLEMENCY FOR LEONARD PELTIER

SATURDAY, MAY 21, 2011, TACOMA, WA. 
· 1:00pm - 4:00pm



12:00 NOON: MARCH FOR JUSTICE Portland Ave. Park (on Portland Ave. between E. 35th & E. Fairbanks. Take Portland Ave. exit off I-5 and head east)


1:00 PM: RALLY FOR JUSTICE U.S. Federal Court House, 1717-Pacific Ave.

Like an onslaught of a mighty storm, crisis has beset the people from many directions. Those that have it all keep on wanting more from those who have very little at all. They who have it all believe that their greed and power is the natural order of things, the way things must be. We struggle now, as we must, against powerful forces that just take and never concede to us anything in return without a struggle. This is a hard road we travel down and there is none of us who can really escape this reality.

The forces of greed would have us believe that each struggle is an issue in itself, separate and unconnected to others. This keeps us divided and weak. For if we are to withstand the onslaught of greed, we need to come to understand that all things are connected. An injury to one is an injury to all.

Our struggles are like streams of water flowing down a mountain side. We can turn these streams aside to flow alone, or dam them with our limited understand of the way things are and thus disperse harmlessly upon the land. Or our streams can flow into a river of joint connections, adding greater power with every stream that merges with it as it washes down the mountain side to become a great power that none can ignore.

In understanding connections, we learn that what is done to some of us, both in trying to get something from us they want and repressing those of us that speak out and stand up for the people, can be done to any of us at any time. Thus, when we stand in solidarity with others, we stand also, in solidarity with ourselves.

There is no better example of how far the forces of greed and repression will go than the case of Leonard Peltier. Here is a case where there was something corporations and the government wanted, the natural resources on Native land, and they were willing to do anything to get what they wanted. Here is a case where justice did not matter, the laws of this land did not matter, and even the constitution could not stand in the way of their illegal acts. Even lives lost meant nothing to them in their pursuit of that which they wanted.

Leonard is not a history lesson of things in past times. Leonard is still in prison, locked-up since 1976 for the crime of defending his people and Mother Earth. Leonard has grown old in prison and he has severe health problems. It is time to begin a new Leonard Peltier Clemency campaign. President Obama will either win the next election, but can’t run after that, or he will lose and will be going out of office. Either way, he will be more open to granting clemency than he has been so far. A campaign like this takes time to build. This campaign in order to be successful needs to be out in the public view. For these reasons we are starting our new clemency campaign with a regional march and rally in Tacoma on May 21, 2011. It is essential that this public show of support be as strong as possible.

All of you who support Leonard Peltier, we need your help. We cannot let things that might divide us or possible disagreement stand in our way. Given Leonard’s health, the only question that makes any sense is which side are you on? If you stand in solidarity with Leonard, the time has come to act in unity for him.

The Leonard Peltier Offense/Defense Committee (LPODC) has been working hard to rebuild Leonard’s support. Realizing that they cannot do that alone, they have asked some long time Peltier activists to taken on the job of being regional organizers for LPODC. Based upon my past work with the old Northwest Leonard Peltier Support Network, LPODC has asked me to be the regional organizer for the northwest. I agreed to that because I am committed to Leonard for as long as it takes. I wish to point out that I am only an organizer, and not the leader. It is Leonard’s supporters, each and everyone one of you, who are the leaders of this movement. But reality sets in here. I am not what I use to be. I have grown old, I have health problems and I don’t have my own money to put into this like I use to do. I have been out of work for 7 ½ months. But I am willing to give this all that I have, but I need your help even more than in the past.

NEEDS

1. Donations and benefits. Getting the word out costs money.

2.People who can do nice lay-out of fliers and posters.

3. People who can print fliers and posters.

4.People who can handout fliers or post them along with posters.

5. People who can get march fliers out through their newsletters or get articles printed in their publications.

6. People who can forward march statements, like this one, to friends, groups, organizations, e-mail lists, on Facebook, Twitter, to web sites or any other place…

7. People who can help organize car caravans for justice (car pools) to Tacoma.

8. We need a sound system and generator.

9. People to organize video showings.

10. People to make banners and signs.

It will be the people who free Leonard by their strong solidarity. Each and everyone of you can help in some way. Each of you have as much power over as much work as you are willing to do. Please help us show all to see that the people demand Leonard to be set FREE!

Arthur J. Miller, Leonard Peltier Offense/Defense Committee, Northwest Regional Organizer, P.O. Box 5464, Tacoma, WA 98415,  bayou@blarg.net

If you want up-dates on the march and on Leonard Peltier please send a request to: bayou@blarg.net

For more information go to:
 www.whoisleonardpeltier.info/

“[W]e’re not really equal when we’re STILL supposed to uncritically and obediently cheer when white women are praised for winning “women’s rights,” and to painfully forget the Indigenous women and women of colour who were hurt in that same process. We are not equal when in the name of “feminism” so-called “women’s only” spaces are created and get to police and regulate who is and isn’t a woman based on their interpretation of your body parts and gender presentation, and not your own. We are not equal when initatives to support gender equality have reverted yet again to “saving” people and making decisions for them, rather than supporting their right to self-determination, whether it’s engaging in sex work or wearing a niqab. So when feminism itself has become it’s own form of oppression, what do we have to say about it?”

Racialicious - the intersection of race and pop culture

An exerpt from Jessica Yee’s essay in the book “Femnism For Real: Deconstructing The Academic Industrial Complex of Feminism.

(via sexisbeautiful)

I keep being surprised by self-styled ‘feminists’ who turn out to have EDL-esque views on Muslims.

(via cunthorse)

YES YES YES YES A HUNDRED TIMES YES.

(via stfuislamophobes)

(via stfuislamobigotry)

{ honour killings in india. }

reblogging for commentary by thesadnessofpencils and aqrima.

*WARNING* for talk of physical violence and systemic violence, and for racism/colonialism and whitesplaining


aqrima:

grieving:

thesadnessofpencils:

feistyfeminist:

aqrima: [i deleted the original post because i don’t like to have copies of things on my blog, but since it’s reproduced here, it should be fine..?]

feistyfeminist:

grieving:

honour killings in india

I, personally, do not feel that culture is an excuse for violence. In fact, I feel that there is no excuse for violence. Using religion and culture to excuse murder is an act of cowardice. Yet, still they continue…in the name of religion and tradition, etc.

What I find disgusting about this story—beyond the whole pointless death and human intolerance—is that the family changed their story multiple times. Changing your story in such a fashion over and over again is rather indicative of guilt. And an autopsy showing that the young woman suffocated…that, too, seems more like murder than suicide. Were there marks on the neck indicating that she had been hung? Was there rope? Did the rope have any of her DNA embedded in the threads from, you know, hair and skin that would have certainly been torn and irritated? Is there even any evidence that she hung herself, aside from the family’s changing stories?

And isn’t it suspicious that her “suicide” note suddenly appeared after they changed the story?

No, you cannot change society in one day. Ms. Pathak’s brother was right in that. But that doesn’t mean that culture cannot change at all. It can, and it will. Hopefully, one day, the outdated, ignorant, and conservative notion of honor killings will be gone and women will be one step closer to being safe and equal in the cultures that once advocated such archaic systems.

okay, so. this is brutal and horrific, and this is not okay.

but. but but but but but.

you’re saying that this is done in the name of (outdated, archaic, conservative, ignorant) culture, and that is wrong. and some people say that this is what the culture says, and it is outdated, archaic, conservative and ignorant.

you’re working on the assumption that 1) there is some primal indian culture that we (indians, south asians) come from, and 2) that you know what it is.

and you don’t. you really, really don’t. i get the sense you (and the person you reblogged) are just a white feminist who thinks it’s okay to make blatantly racist and imperialist statements about our cultures, while you’re completely ignorant about the ways in which, for one, imperialism has shaped our cultures. made it so that we are in this bind where it’s either fundamentalism or modernity, and nothing. fucking. makes. sense. 

and i’m sorry (actually, i’m not), but this makes me so angry. i don’t like how your interpretations of casteism and the way it comes from our “culture” and blah blah fucking blah…. just recolonize us all over again.

do some fucking research before you make statements like this. seriously. learn some fucking shit.

i can’t even properly comment on this, it just makes me so angry. i’m so tired of my cultures being completely stripped of their complexity and the brutal violence of imperialism that has robbed us of our realities. i am not excusing murder. i’m just saying, don’t say it’s because of our archaic, ignorant, outdated, conservative culture. you have no idea what our “culture” is. there is no single “culture” monolith. so shut the fuck up.

First, I reblogged without comment, so it’d be hard for me to “shut the fuck up” when I hadn’t said anything. Maybe you don’t understand how tumblr works? Its an interesting article and I wasn’t going to delete the comment/credit from the person who brought it to my attention by originally posting it.

Second, reading comprehension is indeed free, and a gift for all who read what you thoughtlessly type. While I can not speak for Grieving, I can read her comment and see that she didn’t even try to judge the entirety of any culture, whether it be Indian, South Asian, Hindu, Jain, Caucasian, Dravidian, etc. The author of this tumblr seemed to spend most of the time focusing on the specifics of the case (DNA, changing stories) and commented on the the victim’s brother saying that you couldn’t “change society in a day” and the victim’s father saying “This is part and parcel of our culture, that you marry into your own caste. Every society has its own culture. Every society has its own traditions.” She then called the notion of honor killings “outdated, ignorant, and conservative.”

But since you wanted to put words in my mouth, I’ll respond. You just excused horrible violence because you feel, wait, I don’t know what you feel because you just flung around baseless insults and couldn’t explain yourself because you were just “so angry.” Here are some facts from the article - since I’m assuming you just reacted without actually taking the time read it, I’ll list them for you:

  • There’s been such a resurgence in honor killings in India that the Prime Minister had to order a “cabinet-level commission to consider tougher penalties in honor killings.”
  • There are village caste councils, or khap panchayats, that are operating as an extralegal morals police force. Courts are trying to curb these councils but politician are afraid to because it will cause them to lose votes. (these councils, along with honor killings are more prevalent in the Northern states.)
  • Here’s the quote for the slain couple’s uncle and suspect in the murder: “What is wrong in it? Murder is wrong, but this is socially the best thing that has been done.”
  • The UN stated that in a 2006 survey 76% of respondents said intercaste marriages were unacceptable.

If you had read the article you would have seen where the author of the comment was coming from. Maybe you should be the one who “learns some fucking shit.” You don’t think this accurately portrays the Indian culture? Take it up with the NYT or coherently explain your point of view here. As it stands, your opinion wasn’t worth reading. Oh, and back to my above point, excusing horrible violence on an innocent victim (a whole line of “but, but, but,” really?) makes you an evil person.

First of all, fiestyfeminist, you have the luxury of not being offended because you are a member of the dominant culture. But when you use this luxury to dismiss a person who is offended by it, that’s your privilege showing through. Kindly check it.

Second of all, neither aqrima nor I are advocating violence in the original article. We are instead pointing out that you attribute the source of this violence to our heritage, the same heritage that has been wrecked by imperialism. The author of the NYT article paints the entirety of South Asia with the brush that says: hey look, a bunch of people are doing honour killings! omg! Look at the backward patriarchy! Nyah nyah nyah nyah!

That you are agreeing to such an opinion is what we are calling your attention to. When you say minority cultures are backwards and archaic, without examining the impact your culture has had on ours, or critically examining the patriarchy that defines your own, be prepared for people such as aqrima or I to call you out on your privilege.

Peace out.

I feel as if I need to add some points of clarification here…if only for my own sanity.

Violence is a form of control and power. It is used to subjugate both women and minorities…and no culture is free of that. All forms of violence are demeaning, ignorant, archaic, etc. In short, those adjectives I used to describe honor killings apply to all forms of violence against women and minorities. That includes domestic violence against women in Western cultures, and the endless amounts of women who are killed every single year by their abusive spouses.

However, this article was not about domestic violence. This article was about honor killings. I stand by the fact that honor killings are fundamentally wrong…just as I stand by the notion that rape, domestic violence, and all other violence against women in each and every single culture is wrong.

Violence, such as honor killings, is often excused as part of “culture.” There are huge debates concerning these topics. For example, should we allow something violent described as “culture” to continue because the word “culture” is employed? Or should we work off the basic assumption of human rights? There is no right or wrong answer to this debate. In my original opinion, I was merely pointing out the fact that culture is used as an excuse when it comes to Ms. Pathak’s death. Take, for example, the uncle’s quote about murder being wrong “but [that] this is socially the best thing that has been done” (ref. the death of Ms. Pathak).

In a nutshell, had this article been about any type of violence against women…I would have commented. Depending on the details of the death, I would have responded in a similar manner by pointing out the very suspicious details of her death and the changing stories of the family members. And, honestly, I don’t see how pointing out that violence against women, the prevalent excuse of “culture,” and the suspicious circumstances surrounding Ms. Pathak’s death is in any way “colonizing,” “imperialistic,” or an example of “white privilege.” Honestly…it’s disgust that anyone would be treated in such a demeaning and cruel manner.

i am going to try to respond to this. i was not planning to, originally, hence the delay, but i’m going to. i don’t think i should have to. it is not my job to prove to privileged people how fucked up they’re being, to try to get them to check their privilege. so it is not, and should not be, my job to prove to you, feistyfeminist and grieving, what exactly is going wrong here. but i’m doing it anyway. and i am pissed off about that. that i feel like i have to prove it to you anyway. because you guys are the ones with the power here, the power to “inform”. the power of the new york times backing you up. the power of assumption, of default. your words are the truth, aren’t they? i don’t like having to prove things to you. but i have to. so:

first, thank you again to thesadnessofpencils for articulating things so well in your response to feistyfeminist. i really really appreciated it, and you pinpointed things very very well.

so, feistyfeminist:

i’m not an expert on how tumblr works, but yeah, i’d gleaned a fair amount of the reblogging system and credit, etc. i am not as familiar with responding and re-responding through comments, but i’m getting there. but yes, i knew that you had reblogged grieving, and i am sorry that i messed up the credit to hir while reblogging.

the thing is, though, you didn’t have to say anything. just like people who read that article and agree with it, and circulate it around to boost signals about oppression against women (without recognizing how racist and imperialist that article was, without recognizing how intersections of gender, caste, racial and cultural violence need to be talked about in any such discussion) …. well, all of you don’t have to say anything. you are endorsing those oversimplistic, racist, ethnicist, imperialist and patronizing views of other cultures by refusing to learn about and acknowledge the whole thing. you are, as thesadnessofpencils so astutely described, saying “nyah nyah nyah nyah! look at the backward patriarchy in that culture; at least we’re not doing that!” defend yourself all you like. the point stands: when you refuse to actually look at all the complex forces at play, you are denying a whole people, a whole culture, a whole “nation” (with all the imperialist, forced connotations of what a nation-state really is, with how a nation-state has never been default for us) our legitimacy, our validity, our history, our politics, our cultureS.

so yes, i read that article. i’d also read about this particular case of honor killings before. to be precise, i skimmed through this nyt article. your assumptions about my lack of knowledge about that are very telling. this is something that i have (painfully, slowly) realized i knew nothing about, something that i have had to realize was portrayed through the elitist media (upper middle and upper class, upper caste hindu) apologia (to a western audience, because the thing is, you’re still brown, you’re still indian, you’re still not white, as much as the fundamentalist hindutva crowd might want to trace their ancestry back to some kind of white, aryan race…. you still have to apologize to the west, who have colonized and re-colonized us, you still have to be “liberal” like them, because “liberal” is the way to go, didn’t you know?)

i grew up in india, mostly northern india, among a diverse array of people, and a whole lot more diverse array of people i was privileged not to interact with, not to care about. and so the news i heard was a mixture of liberal and leftist indian academia and apologia, and protests and realities from grassroots social justice organizers (many of whom came from much less privileged backgrounds, and many of whom did not have the upward mobility that my family did). my father is a member of both of these crowds, if they can be generalized at all as such (which they really can’t, but, well). my mother is a white american, with all the complex and painful realities of what that, my parents’ union and my positionality and biracial identity, means. why am i telling you this? because i think it’s important. i shouldn’t have to prove these things to you, but i do, so i am telling you these things about my background, about the complex politics of my background, in the hope that you might realize that… actually, there is no default neutral of “knowing” or “not knowing” about honor killings in india. you tell me statistics, and they burn in my face.

a few years ago, i would have agreed with you. i would have been shocked and upset about this, and i would have been very angry about patriarchy and casteism in india. and i still am. i am much more upset about it than you know. you tell me i’m an evil person, that i’m excusing violence with complexity, and i’m writing this here to tell you that actually, the complexity only makes the violence sharper, more real. the complexity cannot erode the violence. it is the explanation, but it cannot be the excuse (credit to richard siken’s poem, snow and dirty rain, for that phrase). it cannot be the excuse, because i, we, live with this history. because i live with the knowledge that i grasped onto white amerika instead of paying attention to my history. because the violence of priding the west over a postcolonial state that the west carries the legacy of colonizing, and continues to colonize… because that violence is real. because the violence of what happened to nirupama pathak, and her fiance who remains unnamed throughout that article (because upper caste people are the only ones to talk to, didn’t you know? they’re nice and liberal, they talk about “old india”s and “new india”s and nice linear history “we shouldn’t be like this in the 21st century [we have to be more like you white western people, you’ve got it all right, yes yes we realize that now, sorry sorry]”) … because that violence is horrific. because she should not have died. because imagine what her fiance is living through now, with the knowledge that he is so wrong, so untouchable, that his lover deserved to be killed rather than marry him.

because i don’t like any entire marginalized culture, mine or anyone else’s, being completely written off. “archaic”. “conservative”. how do you know what is archaic and conservative? how do you know the history of caste violence? how do you know that history is linear and chronological, period? how do you know what changed with colonialism and what didn’t? how do you know about the oppression in pre-colonial times and the oppression in colonial times and the oppression in post-colonial times? how? how do you so easily take the apologia of upper-caste middle class privileged folks in india as the right thing, oh yes, at least they’re admitting that culture can be changed, at least they should try, blah blah blah blah. Because it makes you happy to hear that. It makes you happy to be told, over and over, affirmed, that your way is the right way. That you’ve got it all right. That you understand cultureS, so much so that you can make it one great culture monolith.

it’s very wonderfully ironic that you say “take it up with the NYT or coherently explain your point of view here”. wonderful use of the tone argument, i must say. (this is a more direct summary). also, you establish my point exactly. the point is, the new york times represents white amerika (mostly). so what you are telling me is that i, a south asian person, should have to tell the new york times to stop being racist and imperialist, because otherwise the new york times has the perfect right to do so. thank you for putting the onus on me, as a marginalized person.

also, this? “reading comprehension is indeed free”
actually, no, it’s not. it isn’t free for the illiterate, for those who see or process things differently (and are thereby constantly dealing with ableism), for those who don’t have the access (financial or otherwise) to literate education, etc etc etc etc. it also isn’t free for those who don’t know english, since you are talking about the reading comprehension of english-knowing people here.

and by the way, your limited understanding of indian cultures (“Indian, South Asian, Hindu, Jain, Caucasian, Dravidian, etc”) really conflates religion with race and ethnicity and geographic location and nationality and probably other things too, and, again, is extremely limited. And no, the “etc” doesn’t cut it. What you did choose to put before the “etc,” based on your limited understanding which you defend rather a lot, is very interesting and ironic.

grieving:

of course violence is wrong. of course rape is wrong. of course murder is wrong. you point out that “culture” is used as an excuse, but you don’t understand why it is used as an excuse. (it’s because we’re struggling, we need to prove to you that we’re trying to change fast enough, that we’re becoming like you fast enough, a nice superpower, so you don’t come drop your bombs on us, so you don’t come in and set up camp again). you don’t understand how the “culture as monolith” argument works. you don’t understand the painful history of it. the cultures that it denies. i am not excusing casteism. which is why i would think twice, now, now that i am realizing my privilege, finally, finally (and i am ashamed), before sapping up what upper-caste people have to say about it, whether they’re supporting it or not. i’ve heard far too many people, you see, say that “oh yes we don’t agree with casteism, that’s really bad…. but we have separate dishes for our servants,” and “reservations, oh my god, you mean we’ll actually have to have our privilege wrenched away from us just a tiny bit?! omg no, no, we must protest this reservations business immediately!” because the “debates” you just casually insert in — because they are the point. because you act like there is a basic notion of human rights that doesn’t oppress people. because you subscribe to the same old tired liberal, individualist, democratic bullshit.

and the thing is? violence is systemic. address the systemic issues, and maybe we have a fighting chance at making things better.

{ I don’t have the spoons to deal with this. }

queeroctopus:

whatfreshhellisthis:

But after this post?

Sorry English Major Armadillo, consider yourself unfollowed.

I am a person with a learning difficulty; hearing such violent rhetoric around grammar and spelling was enough, but now this piece of privilege denying garbage has been published without comment I can see you have no intention of changing nor understanding or sympathy as to why you should.

Bye then, don’t let the door hit you on your privileged butt as you walk away unharmed.

My boyfriend has Dyslexia and his spelling is really, really poor. Naturally, people assume he is unintelligent and ill-educated. He’s one of the smartest people I know. Anyone who thinks that ableism only refers to people with physical problems can stfu.

^ totally agree.  lotta discussion on how the whole “speak ‘proper’ english” thing is bigoted in many many ways — ableist, classist, racist, culturocentric, anti-neurodiversity, colonialist, and i probably missed a few other isms too.  language snobbery, gotta love [read: hate] it.

also, this is the most fucking ridiculous line i’ve read in a while: “When you put yourself on a pedestal above everyone who’s posted on the blog, you put yourself into a morally ableist position.”  AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

(via campdracula5eva)

{ I would like to remind people that there is no such thing as Islamic culture. }

deepblueskies:

whatsajuthika:

Islam is a highly diverse religion, intertwined with thousands and thousands of cultures in countries. Using the term ‘Islamic culture’ to compare to ‘Western culture’ kind of sounds like ‘those primitive PoC’s’ and ‘the enlightened white people who freed them’.

Islamic culture would mean that the culture in Bangladesh and Saudi Arabia are the same, or Egypt and Indonesia. Islam is practiced in so, so many different ways and like I said, our culture influences our religion and vice versa. 

Thaaaaank you. I hate especially when the media calls North Africa/Western Asia the “Arab World” as if all the countries in the region are homogeneous. The fuck out of here.

re-reblogging for correction and additional commentary.

(via janedoe225)

fiercelynative:

svnoyi:

fiercelynative:

[image: black-and-white dragon set against an alternating background of text on parchment and, like, some gold ceiling tiles or something, idk. Text at the top of the image says: “SEE AN EMPTY TABLE IN THE CAFETERIA” accompanying text at the bottom concludes: “GET THERE FIRST AND CLAIM IT FOR BRITAIN.”]
whatfreshhellisthis:

Haaaa~ This amuses me in a bitter way.
Oh, Britain. What colonial, genocidal douchefucks we are.

I’m sick and didn’t get to have my morning coffee so I fully admit to elevated levels of crabbiness but, uh. “Empty” table?

More like “See a table full of people minding their own business, claim it’s empty, kill all that oppose you, and claim it for Britain.”

Seriously, the more I think about it, the more it pisses me off. It’s like, you realize how fucked up and dangerous it is to be perpetuating the idea that the land Britain colonized was uninhabited/unused, even if you’re doing so in jest, right? Even if you’re doing so in a way that is critical of Britain, it’s still super fucked up to let words like “empty” go unchallenged when it comes to indigenous populations that are systematically erased on a daily basis. I mean, fucking hell.

reblogging for commentary.

fiercelynative:

svnoyi:

fiercelynative:

[image: black-and-white dragon set against an alternating background of text on parchment and, like, some gold ceiling tiles or something, idk. Text at the top of the image says: “SEE AN EMPTY TABLE IN THE CAFETERIA” accompanying text at the bottom concludes: “GET THERE FIRST AND CLAIM IT FOR BRITAIN.”]

whatfreshhellisthis:

Haaaa~ This amuses me in a bitter way.

Oh, Britain. What colonial, genocidal douchefucks we are.

I’m sick and didn’t get to have my morning coffee so I fully admit to elevated levels of crabbiness but, uh. “Empty” table?

More like “See a table full of people minding their own business, claim it’s empty, kill all that oppose you, and claim it for Britain.”

Seriously, the more I think about it, the more it pisses me off. It’s like, you realize how fucked up and dangerous it is to be perpetuating the idea that the land Britain colonized was uninhabited/unused, even if you’re doing so in jest, right? Even if you’re doing so in a way that is critical of Britain, it’s still super fucked up to let words like “empty” go unchallenged when it comes to indigenous populations that are systematically erased on a daily basis. I mean, fucking hell.

reblogging for commentary.

(Source: , via lakalenyu-deactivated20111225)

“I understand that your art is important to you, but please understand that our culture, and our sacred things, are important to US. It’s only through the brutal history of non-Natives, especially Europeans, in our lands that allows non-Natives to flippantly take what they want from us and use it without consideration for the meanings behind what they take, and the effects that their appropriation has.”

♥ᏒᏃᏱ♥ (svnoyi)

unfortunately the “BUT IT’S ART YOU CAN’T DO ~CENSORSHIP~ ON IT!” whitesplainers have not gotten the message yet.

(via atsilvsgi-deactivated20120518)

custerdiedforyoursins:

fiercelynative:

[image: ignorant racists posing in stereotypical “native” party  costumes, saluting with hands and beers the people whose genocide they  have historically benefited from! Nothing says “honor” like turning a  race of marginalized people into your party theme, am I right or am I  right, y’all?]
svnoyi:

indigopyrithea:

My dad and sister (Soaring Eagle and Little Weed)once in a while  my family like to throw native american parties out of appreciation for  the Navajo and Cherokee people. At our last party my aunt showed up  dressed as a cowboy waving an American flag. So we stole it and burnt  it. 

Been having The Worst Day Ever (tm), so I just do not even have the energy for this. But couldn’t leave it alone. So I’ll leave it here for others.

Privilege: It means being able to stomp your feet and throw a tantrum about how you’re honoring native  people because you SAY you’re honoring them, damn it, and if any  actual, living natives speak up and say they don’t feel very fucking  honored, in fact they feel the exact fucking opposite of  honored, well fuck them, right? They should just shut up, be your party  costume and feel ~honored~ that you would be so kind as acknowledge them  at all, much less go to the trouble of caricaturizing them for your own  amusement!

Translation: “The wise elders, squaws, Tiger Lilys, and drunk injuns should be grateful that us whites appreciate their proud culture of fake buckskin, dreamcatchers as necklaces, and bullets (wtf?), but only the two tribes that we’ve ever heard of.”

custerdiedforyoursins:

fiercelynative:

[image: ignorant racists posing in stereotypical “native” party costumes, saluting with hands and beers the people whose genocide they have historically benefited from! Nothing says “honor” like turning a race of marginalized people into your party theme, am I right or am I right, y’all?]

svnoyi:

indigopyrithea:

My dad and sister (Soaring Eagle and Little Weed)
once in a while my family like to throw native american parties out of appreciation for the Navajo and Cherokee people. At our last party my aunt showed up dressed as a cowboy waving an American flag. So we stole it and burnt it. 

Been having The Worst Day Ever (tm), so I just do not even have the energy for this. But couldn’t leave it alone. So I’ll leave it here for others.

Privilege: It means being able to stomp your feet and throw a tantrum about how you’re honoring native people because you SAY you’re honoring them, damn it, and if any actual, living natives speak up and say they don’t feel very fucking honored, in fact they feel the exact fucking opposite of honored, well fuck them, right? They should just shut up, be your party costume and feel ~honored~ that you would be so kind as acknowledge them at all, much less go to the trouble of caricaturizing them for your own amusement!

Translation: “The wise elders, squaws, Tiger Lilys, and drunk injuns should be grateful that us whites appreciate their proud culture of fake buckskin, dreamcatchers as necklaces, and bullets (wtf?), but only the two tribes that we’ve ever heard of.”

(Source: spiritualearthdweller, via sdfwe4332-deactivated20120124)

{ LINK: Nike Air Native N7 Made for Native Americans }

ohqueouiindiens:

I hear they are also working on track pants that make clean drinking water, sandals that prevent police brutality and winter coats that help residantial school survivors heal.

reblogging for both the horrible article from sneakerfiles and the awesome sarcasm from ohqueouiindiens.

(via firesandwords)