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{ great porno idea }

haterina:

janedoe225:

this guy is a total capitalist and he meets a totally awesome sex positive feminist. he wants to be spanked and called a dirty communist!

right?

right?

ok, i’m sorry…

I was going to go into gratuitous pornographic dialogue here but I’ll spare you all…

THE POWER OF SPANKING IN THE HANDS OF THE PEOPLE

THERE’S GONNA BE AN UPRISING IF YOU KNOW WHAT I MEAN

EDIT: eehh crap i just realized that my little joke would imply that one of them has to have a penis.  i totally fucked up here, sorry about that.

(via torayot)

radicallyhottoff:

dreaminghome:

Hi TOSD community!

We need your help raising $2,000 for a lift and a sling!!  This is the lift that Stacey will use to lift her in and out of bed, to go to the bathroom and take a shower.  It makes a HUGE difference and means that more people can do PA (personal attendant) work and more folks can sign up for careshift slots regardless of their physical abilities. It is a safer way for Stacey to move around and reduces risk and strain (all around) of Stacey and her PAs.

Stand-Up Lift*Since we shot this video we were able to talk the woman selling the lift down from $2,200 to $1,800!  But then realized that we will need to buy a new sling for Stacey to be able to use the lift, which will cost $600.  sigh. 

We had to move fast because to buy the kind of lift Stacey needed would be SO much more than $1,800 and without it, Stacey needed two people to lift her out of bed.  (Special thanks to Steph, Elaine, Rhea, Yvonne, Io, and Evan for filling last-minute careshift slots to help Stacey get out of bed before she had the lift!!  Go, team community!) 

So, now we have the lift, but still need to fundraise the money it costs as well as buy the sling Stacey needs to be able to use it. 

We are asking folks, if you’re able to, to help us pay for the lift and sling.  Please use the chipIn link to the right to give or email totheothersideofdreaming@gmail.com to send a check. 

Any amount is so appreciated, because the very act of giving is more powerful than the amount of money. And we know that there are many ways to give; that giving money is no more valuable than the folks who have given their time, support, love and care.  

We wished we lived in a world where we didn’t have to pay for access, where ableism and capitalism weren’t so intertwined.  Where we could all be able to use the bathroom and visit our loved ones, wherever they may be.  You all give us faith that that world is possible.  It is.  The support we have received from people (around the world) for TOSD has been astounding, proving what we already know is true, even as we trudge through the tedium and exhaustion of daily access: collective access is possible and we aren’t alone.

with love and appreciation,

Mia and Stacey

PS: This is the first of many videos to come from TOSD! Stay tuned for our next one, the adventure to get the lift, soon!

SOOO SO SO happy for STACEY AND MIA!!!!!!! Support them if you can!!!!! XOXOXO

(via bigbadcolored-deactivated201104)

{ LINK: Angela Davis and Toni Morrison talk about "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave - A New Critical Edition" -- from BookTV }

this is awesome — something very powerful about watching two awesome, accomplished, thoughtful women talking about deep subjects.  and they don’t just talk about the book, they talk about a lot of things, including how capitalism has permeated American emotions, immigration and anti-immigrant bigotry, abuse and self-destruction, the death penalty, and the deliberate purpose of racism.  definitely my favorite BookTV thing so far.

it’s over two hours, though.  lots of free time and snacks are recommended.

{ LINK: More Native Appropriations, Heritage Capitalism, and Fashion on Antiques Roadshow « threadbared }

realitycheckindianimages:

This post is inspired by Sarah Scaturro‘s comments to one of my previous posts about the Black Fashion Museum Collection. In her comments, she mentions the Save Our African-American Treasures program, which she describes as “an Antiques Roadshow (minus the price appraisal) type of event” that travels to different cities to discover, preserve, and celebrate the material cultural histories of African Americans.

One of the reasons I was so intrigued by this program is precisely because it doesn’t operate through the heritage capitalist logics of the Antiques Roadshow on PBS. From what I can tell, the Save Our African-American Treasures program is primarily a conservation effort and not a public display of one’s vested interest in the heritage of Americana. It’s the Forest Gump-like display and valorization of what I can only describe as “heritage capitalism” by the predominantly white appraisers and guests that irks me about the Antiques Roadshow. (Why is there so little scholarship on the Antiques Roadshow‘s circuits of commodities, capitalism, and racial citizenship?)

I began watching the Antiques Roadshow on and off just a couple of months ago. What I found amusing about the show is the guests’ reactions to the appraisals of their family heirlooms – you can tell when someone is genuinely surprised or disappointed with the estimate and when they’re feigning surprise. Also funny (to me, at least) are the various stories guests tell about how they or their families acquired these objects. Most are pretty quotidian stories about unexpected discoveries at yard sales, thrift stores, and estate sales but some are really grand narratives about their genetic linkages to American founding fathers, European royalty, and a motley crew of adventure-seeking, risk-taking, fly-by-the-seat-of-their-pants, off-the-beaten-path family relatives who acquired Persian rugs, Chinese Ming vases (always Ming era), French antique jewelry, and Native American dolls in their world adventures. I have to admit that I get a little giddy when the appraisers myth-bust these stories. There was an episode devoted to family myth-busting, if I remember correctly.  Actually, Marie Antoinette never owned this hair comb set you inherited from your great-aunt. It’s likely a reproduction made in the 1940s in Watertown, New York.

Other than the human interest aspects of the show, I never found it that interesting. (It’s probably because I wouldn’t know a Biedermeier from an Oscar Meyer, as Martin Crane put it in the Frasier episode featuring the Antiques Roadshow called “A Tsar is Born”.) But my casual disinterest turned into a serious criticism of the show when I caught this recent appraisal of a Tlingit (indigenous people of Alaska) bowl and ladle.

The guest narrates a valiant story about Colonel Charles Erskine Scott Wood (the great-great-grandfather of the guest),who was on a “scientific expedition” to the Sitka area of Alaska in the spring of 1877 when he somehow came upon this bowl and ladle. The guest is unclear on the details: “And I don’t know specifically if he was given these or if he may have bartered something.” (That these objects might have been stolen is not a possibility imagined by the guest but one that I immediately considered.)

Note the partial image of Colonel Charles Erskine Scott Wood decked out in classic imperialist garb.

After her story, the appraiser fills in the details about the history of the bowl and ladle telling her and viewers, “These would have been considered family heirlooms of the Tlingit people.” “These objects are alive in the Native consciousness.” “It’s as rare as can be. It’s a Native American masterpiece.” The guest nods and utters a few “wow”s while she listens. (Meanwhile, I’m screaming, Give them back! Give them back!)

The excitement builds, reaching the climactic event: the actual appraisal. “The mountain sheep horn ladle at auction would sell in the range of about $75,000 … at auction this bowl would realize easily in the $175,000 to $225,000 range.”  Overcome with emotion about her cultural-capital inheritance of the spoils of history, she responds thusly:

The guest’s facial gesture projects a self-satisfied smugness that exemplifies the privileges of heritage capitalism. Hardly concerned about verifying how someone elses rare “family heirlooms” and “masterpieces” came into her family’s possession, she’s simply thrilled to have them.

More important than the monetary value of these objects, is the wealth they materially signify: the wealth that comes from centuries’ long and continuous accumulation of property and assets, the emotional and physical security and entitlements such property and assets enable, and the ability to pass down to future generations the socioeconomic status that inheres to such property and assets. This wealth secures and reproduces, as George Lipsitz explains in his book with the same name, “the possessive investment in whiteness.”

Whiteness is more than a racial identification; it’s a racial inheritance of a history of privilege, property, and opportunity secured by and through heritage capitalism. More still, “the advantages of whiteness,” as Lipsitz asserts, “[are] carved out of other people’s disadvantages.” In situating the bowl and ladle within her family history in the context of a public television show, these objects become public objects of a particular heritage of whiteness. Their public display publicly recognizes and reaffirms this racial narrative of American heritage – one that depends on the historical and ongoing disadvantaging of Tlingit people and their descendants. The significance of the bowl and ladle to the Tlingit are contained and limited to the ways their exotica adds to the wealth of the guest’s inheritance, to the way they help to accumulate further the possessive investment in whiteness. Through the  Antiques Roadshow, “the structural and cultural forces that racialize rights, opportunities, and life chances in [the U.S.]” are sentimentalized as heritage and secured as natural (Lipsitz).

Such appropriations are not external to fashion. Mimi’s compilation of blog posts addressing “native appropriations” in so-called hipster fashions as well as the numerous comments we received about this issue bear this out well. The bowl and the ladle at the Antiques Roadshow, like the feather headdress at Urban Outfitters, are put into the service of  “materializing,” in Philip Deloria’s words, “a romantic past” forged by a long and persistent tradition in America of “playing Indian.” This tradition, Deloria reminds, “clings tightly to the contours of power” to create a national subjectivity of whiteness constituted through racially gendered and classed “contrasts.”

The recent addition of clothes as a category of antiques explored on the Antiques Roadshow makes alternative programs like the Save Our African-American Treasures program all the more important for materializing non-dominant histories and for articulating a radical politics of vintage. (Mimi’s already begun this project in her series of posts organized under the category “Vintage Politics!)

If you’re interested in watching the fashion appraisals on Antique Roadshow, look for episodes in which appraiser of antique clothing, lace, and textiles Karen Augusta appears.

(via lakalenyu-deactivated20111225)

[image: photo of a person at a rally, holding up a sign that reads “FAMILIES HAVE NO BORDERS”.]
keeponcrossing:

President Obama has been conducting highly publicized strategy meetings to renew the debate over immigration reform.  It’s not that Latin@ celebrities, politicians, and public figures do not have relevant opinions, but when will Obama seek the opinions and communication of immigrant families, undocumented students, migrant workers, and day laborers?  Where is the morality of family preservation over and above the “morality” of protecting the law?  A recent news piece outlined Obama’s immigration reform basics:   

His administration supports a plan that would further secure the  Southwest border, punish businesses that hire illegal immigrants, and  create a legal immigration system that can better meet the needs of   U.S. businesses and foreigners who want to work in the country.

This in-the-service-of-capitalism approach focuses on the “security” of national and economic benefits for US industry, not on reforming policies like NAFTA that create the impoverished conditions for forced migration from Mexico to the US.  Within this framework, immigrants are always seen through the lens of temporary labor and not through the lens of permanent citizenship; there is no sense of dignity or human rights, just service.  When the policy focus is business practices and profit, halting inhumane deportations that leave children vulnerable and divided from their parents seems like less of a priority.           

[image: photo of a person at a rally, holding up a sign that reads “FAMILIES HAVE NO BORDERS”.]

keeponcrossing:

President Obama has been conducting highly publicized strategy meetings to renew the debate over immigration reform.  It’s not that Latin@ celebrities, politicians, and public figures do not have relevant opinions, but when will Obama seek the opinions and communication of immigrant families, undocumented students, migrant workers, and day laborers?  Where is the morality of family preservation over and above the “morality” of protecting the law?  A recent news piece outlined Obama’s immigration reform basics:   

His administration supports a plan that would further secure the Southwest border, punish businesses that hire illegal immigrants, and create a legal immigration system that can better meet the needs of U.S. businesses and foreigners who want to work in the country.

This in-the-service-of-capitalism approach focuses on the “security” of national and economic benefits for US industry, not on reforming policies like NAFTA that create the impoverished conditions for forced migration from Mexico to the US.  Within this framework, immigrants are always seen through the lens of temporary labor and not through the lens of permanent citizenship; there is no sense of dignity or human rights, just service.  When the policy focus is business practices and profit, halting inhumane deportations that leave children vulnerable and divided from their parents seems like less of a priority.           

(Source: , via rosas-sylvestres)

kitty-tits:

could we please just think for a moment about how mass-producing Che Guevara’s face on merchandise and selling it to probably several thousand consumers via chain stores run by massive corporations is possibly one of the most ironic and troll-y things anyone has ever done

(Source: pr0nfarr, via kadalkavithaigal)

{ Black women are not }

blackamazon:

Allowed to:

- critique anything as it might make men/women/ black women/white women/the family parrot uncomfortable

- notice how and why it makes any of those parties uncomfortable as that makes them weak and waiting on ” approval”

- opt out of spaces that violate their emotional and physical security if they have the means

- try to negotiate for the means if they don’t

- disturb any capitalistic enterprise

- center themselves as protesters or commentators on their own experience

Fortunately black women being ornery contrary wench folk as they are ignore these rules and hurt feeling and jumble discourse and calling us wrong does NOTHING to change that

It’s always been your favorite word for us

{ The ability to participate in systems of capitalist domination }

whatishighfunctioning:

I feel like the majority of the time that I hear the phrase “high functioning,” the speaker is referring to a person who has a steady job despite the fact that this person is visibly disabled. The phrase is almost always prefaced by the word “but.” Such as “Susie has [whatever] BUT she is high functioning. Just look at her work!” This is the kind of person we want as part of our society, an obedient worker (but never as our boss). The implication being that because she is working, earning money, shopping, and paying taxes she is a model citizen… for other disabled people.

Contrast with “low functioning” (yes, I have seriously heard people called this): this person does not contribute taxes (some how sales tax is always forgotten). Therefore they are a drain on our nation’s money when we need to spending it all on the wars!

(via awyeahmona)

{ warnings: ableism, imperialism, capitalism, bureaucracy, classism, social security / welfare }

kavitiya:

summoner-controller-kel:

“Social Security is based on a principle. It’s based on the principle that you care about other people.”

—Noam Chomsky (via cultureofresistance)

except that (among other things) they make things extremely difficult for those of us who are trying to get services from them.. and they’re so bureaucratic and awful and insist on such things as “disability determination” teams to “prove” that you’re disabled and they count up your money and they penalize you if you weren’t exact and how on earth are you supposed to be exact anyway and if you don’t do everything on time everything will be bad and they deny your applications for assistance and they make you wait forever and ever and they’re extremely unaccommodating and they discriminate against marginalized peoples forever and

i’m not sure these problems would be solved if there was more funding for welfare and social security either; there’s something incredibly inherently flawed about a system that is imperially imposed and that involves bureaucratic measures of poverty, disability, inability (and they’re always trying to get you to work! and you have to prove it! because if you can’t work that’s the worst thing ever, of course, and if you don’t want to work on top of that… well that’s bad, real bad) and that isn’t in any way about communities of support at all. community is very very different from bureaucratized institutions, if community was even what chomsky was trying to get at here…

/hating how much trouble social security is giving me right now, for that matter

(Source: democracynow.org, via kavitiya-deactivated20111229)

“It looks like we finally know the reason why Republicans are refusing to fund FEMA, the federal agency that responds to natural disasters. Former Republican Governor Jeb Bush is set to lead a newly formed FOR-PROFIT natural disaster response company. According to the Maritime Executive, Bush’s newly created firm, Old Rhodes Holding LLC, joined forces with O’Brien’s Response Management, a subsidiary of SEACOR Holdings, to form a for-profit disaster response company. “We are pleased to enter into this partnership with one of the leading response organizations in the United States, backed by SEACOR’s global network,” Bush said. “Together we look forward to helping a broader array of organizations and communities become more resilient through preparation, response, communication and recovery.” Of course, this response team only helps people for a price. Rather than come to the aid of people affected by a natural disaster out of the kindness of their hearts, like FEMA and other organizations do, the response team led by the former Florida Governor will respond to disasters if the price is right. In other words, they’ll profit off of death and destruction.”

The REAL Reason Why Republicans Want To Abolish FEMA: So They Can Profit From Natural Disasters (via midwestmountainmama)

Compassionate conservatism.

(via thetart)

(via so-treu)