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{ The Ableism of Anti-Trigger-Warning Sentiment and Why it Matters }

fuckyeahtriggerwarnings:

You, most likely, have already read the post that inspired this little rant. But I’m not going to link to it. Mainly because no one reading this deserves to be exposed to the OP’s fuckery again and partially because because this seems to be a universal problem, and it seems to operate thusly:

Step 1: People with disabilities develop a system that allows us to be safe and active in a discourse, much of which is about us and our safety (think image descriptions on PWD websites). Hooray for accessibility!

But then, Step 2: A Privileged Fuck comes along and says, “waiiiit, there are all of these self-advocating PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES out here and they seem to be challenging my right to blather on about other people’s lived experiences. Oh noes!” And thus, ableist slurs/image descriptions/transcripts/trigger warnings for PTSD survivors become really fucking contentious issues.

Until, Step 3: the people with the disability in question either

A. give up on participating in that particular community (which invariably spends, I’ll say it again, a lot of time discussing the lived experience of those self-same people) or

B. stop participating in actual, mutually-beneficial conversations amongst community members and instead spend all of their energy trying to show the Privileged Fuck why ze needs to stop jeopardizing our access to the community. This will go on for as long as Privileged Fuck holds out before realizing what an asshole they look like.

Either way, the outcome is the same: contesting the basic accessibility rights of a PWD can almost guarantee you that this person—and everyone with that person’s disability—will shut the fuck up about whatever it is they were saying before you implied that they had no right to occupy space in your little online universe.

For survivors, and other people with post-traumatic reactions, any vague threat to our communities’ emphasis on trigger warnings functions exactly like the phenomenon above. We become terrified that this threat will actually be realized, that trigger warnings will seem “antiquated” or “too sensitive,” and that we will never be able to participate safely in conversations about our own experience of rape/abuse/violence.

And so, comments like, “why do you need a trigger warning?” or “aren’t you being over the top?” aren’t just offensive, they’re debilitating. Because they require us to drop absolutely everything we were working on before and focus solely on defending our right to exist here, online, in the communities we’ve helped build without fearing for our psychological safety.

When you divert survivors’ attention from rape culture, you perpetuate rape culture.

When you divert soldiers’ attention from the evils of the military-industrial complex, you perpetuate the military-industrial complex.

When you divert the attention of people who’ve suffered systematic abuse from combating systematic abuse, you. perpetuate. that. abuse.

This is about way more than just “hurt feelings” or “hiding from the truth.” This is about our survival as people, as a community, and as a social justice movement.

(via sdfwe4332-deactivated20120124)

{ Heck yeah image descriptions }

eateroftrees:

jhameia:

sqbr:

I’ve posted before about why I think people should add image/video descriptions, but a common response is “I can’t imagine many people who need them would use tumblr”.

So I asked some disabled fans and sure enough, there are people on tumblr who use these descriptions (and not always because of visual problems or any sort of disability). Since (a)People who have trouble with some images etc may be able to access others (but would appreciate having the ones they can’t made more accessible too) and (b)Sometimes irritatingly inaccessible things have no accessible equivalent so you put up with it.

I realise that detailed descriptions and transcripts can be a pain (my own energy/cognitive issues mean I often can’t do more than a vague description myself) But if possible, when you post an image, video, or audio clip think about whether or not there’s a short simple description you could add which would help get across the point to someone who can’t access the content fully or at all. Two obvious examples are transcribing images of a single sentence of text and giving the artist and title of videos and music.

Oh, and if you’re not going to do descriptions yourself, please at least don’t remove them when other people do. That’s just frustrating.

If you read this tumblr and DO use these descriptions: is the way I do them helpful, or would you rather I did it differently?

(I’m now wondering about DeviantArt and the Homestuck fanart boards, which are the two other places I tend to post images, and where one might assume noone needs image descriptions but probably not be entirely correct)

I have to say that I love video transcripts. I don’t know if it counts as a disability, but sometimes I don’t listen very well (not like, I’m not paying attention, but like, I hear the words but sometimes they’re not meaningful to me, or just not registering in my brain what’s happening, especially with difficult ideas), so I’m much more comfortable having something to read along, especially if it’s a speech or lecture where there aren’t a lot of visual signifiers of what’s going on. 

So, people who do video transcripts, I heart you muchly. 

Things with color in them where recognizing what color things are is important.  Seriously colorblindness is really common and not usually a problem for things but occassionally it can be serious.  Especially with like, charts or maps that are colorcoded (though I’m not really sure how you’d go about transcribing those because they tend to be complex)

And images with just text, because those are super easy to transcribe and when I had issues with my internet being super slow they were frequently completely inaccessible, because pages weren’t loading embeded objects right.  Text worked fine, but pictures not at all.

eateroftrees later added:

Reblogging this again to add that another problem that occasionally will come up is people’s profile themes don’t underline links.  This is a serious problem to accessibility to colorblind people and people with monitors that don’t show colors normally (say, because they’re monochrome or broken, these do exist, and people can be too poor to replace them)

(via thenameoftheworms)

eateroftrees:

sharpclause:

I wish I didn’t have to see animated gifs on my dashboard, they cause problems for me when I’m trying to deal with a migraine, and they can set one off if I didn’t already have one. A think a lot of them are so rapidly moving that they’re probably a seizure risk for some people. The kind that zoom back and forth set off violent nausea for me. I’d hate to have to dig into my settings and disable image loading, because white listing images on a one by one basis is a real pain, and even then, I’m not sure when I do choose to see an image it isn’t going to be a moving image.

I know most people couldn’t give a shit if they hurt a disabled person with their meme spreading, but I don’t get why my progressive friends have to be told that this is an issue. Do you not know anyone who has seizures, migraines, or visual processing problems? I don’t think of this as a web accessibility issue like image descriptions, I think of this as a web safety issue.

Please put your moving images behind a cut and warn for them. Please don’t use animated avatars. Please don’t use animated signature files. Don’t do it out of politeness, do it because you don’t want anyone to get hurt!

I wonder if there are browser extensions that specifically block animated gifs.  It seems like something that there would be a demand for.

Also reblogging so people see this.

(via thenameoftheworms)

{ I’m posting this again on its own }

eateroftrees:

PEOPLE PEOPLE: USE THIS TAG MORE.

Really, if something has content that needs a trigger warning, you should be sticking a cut in and putting a warning before the cut so people can avoid it; it’s pretty easy to accidentally read something bad even when there is a warning on it, just because, say, you’re scrolling up instead of down, or you glance away from your computer and when you look back your eyes go to the wrong spot.

[image above: section of a screenshot of the “Text Post” box on tumblr.  highlighted is the “Insert ‘read more’ break” button, in between the “Spell Checker” button and the “HTML Source” button.]

signal boost.  and i apologize for all the times i’ve failed about this.

(Source: thenameoftheworms)

{ and I should probably be doing video transcriptions as well, and will definitely do audio transcriptions (lyrics, etc.) }

technicolortimecoat:

abigq:

technicolortimecoat:

abigq:

When transcribing YouTube videos that have subtitling it is possible to download the subtitles. I used to have a bookmark to a site that would go and extract them for you but can’t find it right now. If I find it I’ll add an extra post here with the URL.

Oh, okay.

I don’t find very many videos with subtitles though.

Found it: http://disabledfeminists.com/2010/12/31/for-your-tool-box-how-to-get-youtube-captions-to-make-a-transcript/.

I was hoping the auto-captioning google/youtube have could be requested by users - since that could be useful as a starting point - but seems it’s only available for people uploading video: http://www.google.com/support/youtube/bin/answer.py?answer=100077.

Thanks! Reblogging for other folks.

(via technicolortimecoat-deactivated)

{ Can I repeat the request to avoid animated gifs? }

technicolortimecoat:

eateroftrees:

Because honestly when I have a bad headache I start having trouble tracking things on the screen and they make it a lot harder, and can make my headaches worse.

(And, of course, there’s the whole epilepsy thing, but that doesn’t effect me)

Stick a cut and warning in, please.

Yeah, I’ve started doing this recently.

They can make things distracting for me (ADD or autism, dunno which - they both affect attention after all).

signal boost

also i think this is the post that is being referenced (EDIT: yes it is)

(Source: thenameoftheworms, via technicolortimecoat-deactivated)

{ Please Subtitle Your Work }

bearwitnessunto:

arfism:

To everyone who produces videos for the internet and otherwise. Please, please, please put the time into subtitling your work. Make it accessible for everyone. I understand it’s sometimes very time-consuming or confusing to figure out, but it’s worth it - I promise. It’s so frustrating and disheartening when I see NEW amazing, radical, educational, thought-provoking work being put out on the internet and people saying EVERYONE needs to see this… and it’s not subtitled. It happens all the time. All the time. Like 80% (probably higher) of the videos out there is not accessible.  I’m tired of this.

There are subtitling programs out there that you can download (iMovie has a subtitling option btw) to use in order to make your work subtitled. Also if you have already put your work on the internet without it being subtitled, please consider resubmitting a new version with captions, or go to Universal Subtitles and subtitle your work and place a link under your existing work so people who go to watch your work and are disappointed that it’s not subtitled will see that there’s a link to a subtitled version. It’s fairly simple - my friend made the Every Ho I Know Says So  video subtitled and says it’s very user friendly.

Please, stop and think - is your work accessible to people in your community and outside the community, if not… brainstorm up ways to make it so.

This blog Subtitle the Internet is entirely focused on subtitling and captioning videos on the internet and it’s composed by a Deaf person. Please read it if you’re unsure how to make your work subtitled.

I also have to thank my amazing friends who have taken the time to subtitle their videos or write up subtitles for videos out there that aren’t subtitled. You folks are incredible. Thank you.

p.s Please reblog to get this out there and reach people who may have never thought about subtitling before.

Reblogging with links.

I’ve never done this, but the process seems to be the following:

  1. Upload video to youTube
  2. Use http://www.overstream.net/ to create subtitles. There’s a demo video here. There’s a FAQ here.
  3. Watch this video to show you how to upload those subtitles to YouTube.

video descriptions/transcriptions are good, too.

(sorry, i know i fail at that sometimes.)

(Source: zoeenuage, via dawntidesbreeze-deactivated2012)

{ Really, really easy ways to make your blog more accessible }

nicocoer:

blogwiththechagallpainting:

  • When you’re screen-capping an ask, copy and paste the question and answer. Both sets of text are right there in front of you, whereas anyone else would have to copy it down word-for-word. Which is a pain in the ass (especially for folks with dyslexia or other, related learning disabilities).
  • Put your blogroll/links on the right side of your blog. Otherwise, people using screen readers would have to hear all the links before getting to your actual content.
  • When a follower replies to one of your posts, don’t upload an image of the dashboard notification. Copy & paste it if you’re going to reply. This way, screen readers will read the reply as text. Otherwise, they won’t be able to because it’s an image.
  • If you’re uploading a song and commenting on it, at least put the artist and song title, so that deaf/hard of hearing readers can google the lyrics. (It’s also good practice to link to the lyrics, if you can).
  • If you’re uploading/reblogging a video, google the video’s title + “transcript” to see if there’s one all written out already. (If someone’s taken the time to write out a transcript, please don’t rip them off, though. Give them credit!)
  • If you’re uploading audio/video of something you wrote, add the text. Unless you’re speaking extemporaneously, you probably have a document with an approximate transcript anyway.

Yay accessibility and minimal effort!!

ALSO: If you are uploading a video onto youtube, they allow you to upload a text document transcript which THEY will them do the time codes for. SO captioning is as easy as a transcript now. 

(Source: poorlifechoicesblog, via lannistersroar)

{ Animated gifs }

abigq:

sharpclause:

abigq:

kiriamaya:

eateroftrees:

sharpclause:

I wish I didn’t have to see animated gifs on my dashboard, they cause problems for me when I’m trying to deal with a migraine, and they can set one off if I didn’t already have one. A think a lot of them are so rapidly moving that they’re probably a seizure risk for some people. The kind that zoom back and forth set off violent nausea for me. I’d hate to have to dig into my settings and disable image loading, because white listing images on a one by one basis is a real pain, and even then, I’m not sure when I do choose to see an image it isn’t going to be a moving image.

I know most people couldn’t give a shit if they hurt a disabled person with their meme spreading, but I don’t get why my progressive friends have to be told that this is an issue. Do you not know anyone who has seizures, migraines, or visual processing problems? I don’t think of this as a web accessibility issue like image descriptions, I think of this as a web safety issue.

Please put your moving images behind a cut and warn for them. Please don’t use animated avatars. Please don’t use animated signature files. Don’t do it out of politeness, do it because you don’t want anyone to get hurt!

I wonder if there are browser extensions that specifically block animated gifs.  It seems like something that there would be a demand for.

Also reblogging so people see this.

Signal boost.

I’ve been doing my best to avoid anigifs ever since mel pointed out the problem a few months ago. I’ve passed up on reblogging really great posts just because, at some point, somebody saw fit to drop in an anigif for no good reason. I think that, from now on, I will just redact anigifs in my reblogs of those posts.

If you use firefox you can disable animation completely: Open about:config in Firefox and set image.animation_mode to none (or to “once” if you just want to stop them from looping).

OMG, why did I not know this about Firefox? There’s the fix that will work for me and I love you forever for this! I edited the original post to say this but still, people are so supportive right now and I’m appreciate it so much, you have no idea. I’m sorry again that I started out really grouchy about this because you’re all being so awesome and understanding!

Step by step instructions for firefox, for IE and for Opera (Safari doesn’t permit disabling animations; Chrome doesn’t seem to permit it natively, but see below):

http://www.wikihow.com/Stop-Animated-Images-in-a-Browser

(For people who also want to block Flash:

  • Firefox has a couple plugins that permit this (AdBlock, FlashBlock, NoScript);
  • Safari also has such plugins
  • Chrome has (in some builds) the ability to disable Flash natively. Chrome also has a plugin that disables animations and permits one to start them by clicking on the image (I’ve not tested it; doesn’t seem to work for everyone).

)

re-reblogging for more commentary.  and to help keep sharpclause’s OP circulating because it’s important.

(via abigq-deactivated20110918)

{ LINK: nicocoer's "Image Descriptions, Spoons, and Access" page -- please read this if you have not already }