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{ The infamous Virginia Woolf… }

haterina:

wholesomeobsessive:

Would any of my lovely followers happen to know anything interesting about her that could aid me in the writing of this essay?  Focus on To the Lighthouse.  

Thank you.

Signal boooost~

(via torayot)

fuckyeahnigeria:

Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe(born 16 November 1930) popularly known as Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelist, poet, professor, and critic. He is best known for his first novel and magnum opus,Things Fall Apart (1958), which is the most widely read book in modern African literature.
Achebe’s novels focus on the traditions of Igbo society, the effect of Christian influences, and the clash of values during and after the colonial era. His style relies heavily on the Igbo oral tradition, and combines straightforward narration with representations of folk stories, proverbs, and oratory. He has also published a number of short stories, children’s books, and essay collections. He is currently the David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

my introduction to his work was “An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness’”, which is awesome.

fuckyeahnigeria:

Albert Chinụalụmọgụ Achebe(born 16 November 1930) popularly known as Chinua Achebe is a Nigerian novelistpoetprofessor, and critic. He is best known for his first novel and magnum opus,Things Fall Apart (1958), which is the most widely read book in modern African literature.

Achebe’s novels focus on the traditions of Igbo society, the effect of Christian influences, and the clash of values during and after the colonial era. His style relies heavily on the Igbo oral tradition, and combines straightforward narration with representations of folk stories, proverbs, and oratory. He has also published a number of short stories, children’s books, and essay collections. He is currently the David and Marianna Fisher University Professor and Professor of Africana Studies at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island, United States.

my introduction to his work was “An Image of Africa: Racism in Conrad’s ‘Heart of Darkness’”, which is awesome.

(via )

{ LINK: Angela Davis and Toni Morrison talk about "Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave - A New Critical Edition" -- from BookTV }

this is awesome — something very powerful about watching two awesome, accomplished, thoughtful women talking about deep subjects.  and they don’t just talk about the book, they talk about a lot of things, including how capitalism has permeated American emotions, immigration and anti-immigrant bigotry, abuse and self-destruction, the death penalty, and the deliberate purpose of racism.  definitely my favorite BookTV thing so far.

it’s over two hours, though.  lots of free time and snacks are recommended.

{ LINK: : Know the History of... Carter Woodson }

theblackhipsters:

December 19, 1875 - April 3, 1950

Carter Woodson was African-American historian, author, journalist and the founder of The Association of Study of African American life and History and the Journal of Negro history. Not only he was the creator of those sources but he was the founder of…

(Source: coupdetatleblog, via abagond)

{ LINK: A Short Course in Indigenous Feminism }

readnfight:

by Rowland Túpac Keshena

For those who don’t know much about me, I am a currently studying for a Masters Degree in Public Issues Anthropology, specializing in a Fanon and MLM infused analysis of revolutionary Native nationalist and anti-colonialist movements in North Amerika. I also have really strong interrelated interests in revolutionary critical pedagogy, the “reindigenization” of the Chicano community and movement and, the subject of this post, indigenous feminism. Anyway, one of the perks of my program is that I can create my own courses, and I’ve taken such a route this semester by creating my own directed studies course in indigenous feminist theory.

The growth of indigenous feminism is, for me, a huge interest, both personal and academic, not just because of the obvious importance struggling against both white supremacist (ne0)colonial capitalism and hetero-patriarchy if we want to achieve meaningful freedom, justice and equality, but also because for a long time the status quo within our movement was that you could not be both a feminist and a native warrior. On the one hand we are not Native enough if we call ourselves and our movement feminist, but on the other we are not feminist enough for the whitestream feminists since we pointing out that the whitestream movement does not take us, and our unique experiences and struggles into account. I am indigenous man and I find this to be one of the greatest failings of our movement, and for that reason I wholeheartedly endorse, support and promote the rise of an indigenous feminism.

Anyway, with that in mind and in the spirit of sharing ideas, and radical education I’ve decided to post my reading list for others to take a look a lot, critique and/or otherwise contribute their thoughts. It’s made up of a mix of books and articles, both academic and non-academic, which are available on line.

Books:

Making Space for Indigenous Feminism, edited by Joyce Green

I Am Woman: A Native Perspective on Sociology and Feminism, by Lee Maracle

From a Native Daughter: Colonialism and Sovereignty in Hawaii, by Haunani-Kay Trask

Conquest: Sexual Violence and American Indian Genocide, by Andrea Smith

Talkin’ Up to the White Woman: Indigenous Women and Feminism, by Eileen Morton-Robinson

Online Articles:

Indigenous Feminism Without Apology, by Andrea Smith

Jennifer Nez Denetdale on Indigenous Feminisms

An Indigenous Perspective on Feminism, Militarism, and the Environment, by Winona LaDuke

Zapatismo and the Emergence of Indigenous Feminism, by Aida Hernandez Castillo

Academic Journal Publications:

Wicazo Sa Review “Native Feminisms: Legacies, Interventions, and Indigenous Sovereignties,” guest edited by Mishuana R. Goeman and Jennifer Nez Denetdale

Whiteness Matters: Implications of Talking Up to the White Woman, by Eileen Morton-Robinson

Race, Tribal Nation, and Gender: A Native Feminist Approach to Belonging, by Renya Ramirez

Introduction: Special Issue on Native American Women, Feminism, and Indigenism, by Anne Waters

Patriarchal Colonialism and Indigenism: Implications for Native Feminist Spirituality and Native Womanism, by M. A. Jaimes Guerrero

Dismantling the Master’s Tools with the Master’s House: Native Feminist Liberation Theologies, by Andrea Smith

oh my gods yes. This reading list is amazing.

(via so-treu)

{ Feb. notes #3: Lucy Parsons }

readnfight:

Fell behind on this project, been exhausted and unmotivated. So.

I posted this quote by Lucy Parsons a couple days ago:

Let every dirty, lousy tramp arm himself with a revolver or knife on the steps of the palace of the rich and stab or shoot their owners as they come out. Let us kill them without mercy, and let it be a war of extermination and without pity.

Lucy Parsons was rad!! For one thing, she was a great, early anarchist hero (not that I believe in heroes), and was a prominent anarchist writer, speaker, and organizer in a climate where that was difficult for anyone (still is). But then on top of just the normal scariness of that, she was also a mixed-race woman of color. And she didn’t shut up like she was supposed to.

From Wikipedia:

Lucy (or Lucia) Eldine Gonzalez was born around 1853 in Texas, likely as a slave, to parents of Native American, Black American and Mexican ancestry.[1]

In 1871 she married Albert Parsons, a former Confederate soldier, and both were forced to flee from Texas north to Chicago by intolerant reactions to their interracial marriage.

Described by the Chicago Police Department as “more dangerous than a thousand rioters” in the 1920s, Parsons and her husband had become highly effective anarchist organizers primarily involved in the labor movement in the late 19th century, but also participating in revolutionary activism on behalf of political prisoners, people of color, the homeless and women. She began writing for The Socialist and The Alarm, the journal of the International Working People’s Association (IWPA) which she and Parsons, among others, founded in 1883. In 1886 her husband, who had been heavily involved in campaigning for the eight hour day, was arrested, tried and executed on November 11, 1887, by the state of Illinois on charges that he had conspired in the Haymarket Riot – an event which was widely regarded as a political frame-up, and which marked the beginning of May Day labor rallies in protest.[2][3]

In 1892 she briefly published Freedom: A Revolutionary Anarchist-Communist Monthly, and was often arrested for giving public speeches or distributing anarchist literature. While she continued championing the anarchist cause, she came into ideological conflict with some of her contemporaries, including Emma Goldman, over her focus on class politics over gender and sexual struggles.[4]

Portrait of Parsons

In 1905 she participated in the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World, and began editing the Liberator, an anarchist newspaper that supported the IWW in Chicago. Lucy’s focus shifted somewhat to class struggles around poverty and unemployment, and she organized the Chicago Hunger Demonstrations in January 1915, which pushed the American Federation of Labor, the Socialist Party, and Jane Addams’ Hull House to participate in a huge demonstration on February 12. Parsons was also quoted as saying, “My conception of the strike of the future is not to strike and go out and starve, but to strike and remain in and take possession of the necessary property of production.” (Wobblies! 14) Parsons anticipated the sit-down strikes in the US and, later, workers’ factory takeovers in Argentina.

And here is a link to a zine we distro of some of her speeches. It’s mentioned in the wikipedia excerpt, and maybe in the zine (can’t remember) that she anticipated sit-down strikes. She emphasized this a lot, and it’s a big deal; it was a big radical deal to encourage workers to occupy their workplace and to do support work for them when they do, and it’s still a big radical deal when that happens. It’s pretty rare nowadays; the Republic Windows occupation in Chicago was huge because it’s been so long since that was common on a large scale. Much of what I read about her is how much she emphasized support work during things like strikes, that in order to make something like that successful, communities need to come in and support the people struggling, and that at some point those communities are going to need support as well, and the more we support one another the easier it is to have some mutual aid momentum going.

(via firesandwords)

{ TED CHIANG! [Updated] }

wildunicornherd:

wildunicornherd:

Description: An Asian man with long hair pulled into a ponytail, wearing thin-rimmed glasses and a black T-shirt. Credit: Beth Gwinn for Locus.

Ted Chiang’s science fiction career has been pretty remarkable. While he’s only published a handful of short stories over the past twenty years, nearly all of them have been nominated for major awards, and most of them won. His subgenre is difficult to pin down—while stories like “Tower of Babylon” and “Seventy-Two Letters” are steeped in religious mythology, “Understand”, “Exhalation” and “Division by Zero” deal with more technical or scientific concepts. “Story of Your Life” and “The Merchant and the Alchemist’s Gate” play with time and non-linear storytelling. I would say that they are all thought experiments of a sort—polished, philosophical explorations of clearly defined ideas.

That may make Chiang’s work sound rather dry—and maybe it is, I enjoy a certain amount of didacticism in my SF so I’m not the one to say—but while intensely cerebral, his fiction still remains human. Chiang is not one of those writers who seems to think that scientific extrapolation and character development are mutually exclusive, nor the kind that peoples his stories overmuch with brilliant straight white middle-aged men who have difficulty relating to women (which is why I hesitate to call his work “hard SF”). Rather, he eagerly explores how big, world-changing theoretical paradigm shifts affect the everyday lives of ordinary people. In “Division by Zero”, a mathematician’s discovery precipitates a psychiatric crisis and turns her marriage upside down; in “Hell is the Absence of God”, a brutally literal depiction of born-again Christian theology, people form support groups in the wake of angelic visitations, which heal some and disable others. “Story of Your Life” is both an inventive imagining of what alien language could be like, and the story of a woman coping with her daughter’s untimely death.

I could go on and on about Chiang’s writing, but why not see for yourself? Several of his stories are available online in various formats, as listed at Free Speculative Fiction Online:

  • “Understand” (1991), HTML. More conventional and much inferior to his later stuff, but you may find differently.
  • “Division By Zero” (1991), HTML.
  • “Hell Is the Absence of God” (2001), podcast.
  • “What’s Expected of Us” (2005), published in Nature as part of the esteemed science journal’s “Futures” short fiction series (later published as an anthology). Available at Concatenation in PDF with many others. Also, podcast.
  • “The Merchant and the Alchemist’s Gate” (2007), podcast, and archived (HTML): page 1, page 2, page 3.
  • “Exhalation” (2008), podcast, and various formats available at Nightshade Books (and may I say it is the most gorgeous and moving illustration of the Second Law of Thermodynamics EVAR, I highly recommend it if you want your MIND BLOWN)

Oh, and he recently had a new book come out! But that is for future linkspams. NEAR FUTURE LINKSPAMS, more quickly dated and somehow less plausible than far-future, post-Singularity deep-space linkspams. I’ll shut up now.

In addition to all the above, Chiang’s latest, the novella “The Lifecycle of Software Objects”, is online in full.

hooray free stuff to read — probably very good stuff, too, if “Division By Zero” is anything to go by.

yaaaaaaaaaay

(via ardhra)

{ LINK: ok for my 1000th post here is Edwidge Danticat on TED }

rudolove:

February 11 2011
On this day 20 years ago Nelson Mandela walked out of jail after serving 27 years as a political prisoner. 
“It was during those long and lonely years that my hunger for the freedom of my own people became a hunger for the freedom of all people, white and black. I knew as well as I knew anything that the oppressor must be liberated just as surely as the oppressed. A man who takes away another man’s freedom is a prisoner of hatred, he is locked behind the bars of prejudice and narrow-mindedness. I am not truly free if I am taking away someone else’s freedom, just as surely as I am not free when my freedom is taken from me. The oppressed and the oppressor alike are robbed of their humanity.
When I walked out of prison, that was my mission, to liberate the oppressed and the oppressor both. Some say that has now been achieved. But I know that that is not the case. The truth is that we are not yet free; we have merely achieved the freedom to be free, the right not to be oppressed. We have not taken the final step of our journey, but the first step on a longer and even more difficult road. For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The true test of our devotion to freedom is just beginning.
I have walked that long road to freedom. I have tried not to falter; I have made missteps along the way. But I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not yet ended”
Long Walk To Freedom: Part 11, last paragraph.

i cannot do the awesomeness of that picture justice with any description i could come up with.  i’m sorry.  i mean, it’s Nelson and Winnie Mandela after his release, smiling with their fists in the air and surrounded by other happy people, but that just does not do it justice.

rudolove:

February 11 2011

On this day 20 years ago Nelson Mandela walked out of jail after serving 27 years as a political prisoner. 

“It was during those long and lonely years that my hunger for the freedom of my own people became a hunger for the freedom of all people, white and black. I knew as well as I knew anything that the oppressor must be liberated just as surely as the oppressed. A man who takes away another man’s freedom is a prisoner of hatred, he is locked behind the bars of prejudice and narrow-mindedness. I am not truly free if I am taking away someone else’s freedom, just as surely as I am not free when my freedom is taken from me. The oppressed and the oppressor alike are robbed of their humanity.

When I walked out of prison, that was my mission, to liberate the oppressed and the oppressor both. Some say that has now been achieved. But I know that that is not the case. The truth is that we are not yet free; we have merely achieved the freedom to be free, the right not to be oppressed. We have not taken the final step of our journey, but the first step on a longer and even more difficult road. For to be free is not merely to cast off one’s chains, but to live in a way that respects and enhances the freedom of others. The true test of our devotion to freedom is just beginning.

I have walked that long road to freedom. I have tried not to falter; I have made missteps along the way. But I have discovered the secret that after climbing a great hill, one only finds that there are many more hills to climb. I have taken a moment here to rest, to steal a view of the glorious vista that surrounds me, to look back on the distance I have come. But I can rest only for a moment, for with freedom comes responsibilities, and I dare not linger, for my long walk is not yet ended”

Long Walk To Freedom: Part 11, last paragraph.

i cannot do the awesomeness of that picture justice with any description i could come up with.  i’m sorry.  i mean, it’s Nelson and Winnie Mandela after his release, smiling with their fists in the air and surrounded by other happy people, but that just does not do it justice.

(via )

wildunicornherd:

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Octavio Paz & Jorge Luis Borges.

Sci Fi Recs: Contemporary science fiction comprises a plethora of subgenres, national traditions, and fan cultures—and its roots are equally diverse. As far as I’m concerned, it’s just plain wrong to talk about the origin of sf and mention Mary Shelley and Hugo Gernsback but not Jorge Luis Borges, the Argentinian proto-postmodernist.
Borges didn’t do robots or rocket ships or any of the other superficial trappings of sf. Those are weird subjects; Borges weirded the story itself, and the teller — metafiction, the unreliable narrator, dreams and labyrinths and libraries and memory and time. There’s echoes of his stuff in many writers who write what I think of as “honorary science fiction”, like Eco, Calvino and Saramago, but a good many honest-to-goodness genre-ghetto sf writers count Borges as an influence as well: Jeff VanderMeer, Stanislaw Lem, Lucius Shepard, and (one of my favourite authors) Gene Wolfe, who once said “magic realism is fantasy written by people who speak Spanish”. Personally, I agree that when it comes to speculative fiction we should throw the net as wide as we can—which is why I think of Borges’ stories as sci-fi, plain and simple.
Online work:
“The Library of Babel” (1941). Hey, who turned out the lights…?
“Tlön, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius” (1940). Takes the idea of “transformative works” to its logical conclusion.
“The Garden of Forking Paths” (1941).
TL;DR: Just read Ficciones, thank me later.

i will thank you NOW.  free speculative fiction/story recs = ALWAYS AN INSTANT “THANK YOU”.
<3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <4

wildunicornherd:

fuckyeahlatinamericanhistory:

Octavio Paz & Jorge Luis Borges.

Sci Fi Recs: Contemporary science fiction comprises a plethora of subgenres, national traditions, and fan cultures—and its roots are equally diverse. As far as I’m concerned, it’s just plain wrong to talk about the origin of sf and mention Mary Shelley and Hugo Gernsback but not Jorge Luis Borges, the Argentinian proto-postmodernist.

Borges didn’t do robots or rocket ships or any of the other superficial trappings of sf. Those are weird subjects; Borges weirded the story itself, and the teller — metafiction, the unreliable narrator, dreams and labyrinths and libraries and memory and time. There’s echoes of his stuff in many writers who write what I think of as “honorary science fiction”, like Eco, Calvino and Saramago, but a good many honest-to-goodness genre-ghetto sf writers count Borges as an influence as well: Jeff VanderMeer, Stanislaw Lem, Lucius Shepard, and (one of my favourite authors) Gene Wolfe, who once said “magic realism is fantasy written by people who speak Spanish”. Personally, I agree that when it comes to speculative fiction we should throw the net as wide as we can—which is why I think of Borges’ stories as sci-fi, plain and simple.

Online work:

TL;DR: Just read Ficciones, thank me later.

i will thank you NOW.  free speculative fiction/story recs = ALWAYS AN INSTANT “THANK YOU”.

<3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <3 <4

(Source: quericoelmambo)