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[image: graphic of a green chalkboard showing a flow chart.  first, a pair of bare feet captioned with “curiosity”; second, a pair of floating talking heads captioned with “conversation”; third, a pair of hands putting a shoe on a foot captioned with “action”; last, a kid wearing the shoes captioned with “change”.]
iced-chai:

Today is One Day Without Shoes, in which individuals go without shoes “so kids don’t have to.”
Classic opt-out activism, focusing on “raising awareness,” exploiting the appeal of children as compared to adults/individuals in general, and general vagueness (Fact Number One: “Growing up without shoes/In many developing countries, children must walk barefoot for miles to school, clean water & medical help.” From this link, which is a PDF file.)
This article does a great job summarizing the problems with TOMS shoes, the organization behind One Day Without Shoes—which is really just a marketing ploy rather than an awareness raising campaign.
This is another great article, linked to the above one.

[image: graphic of a green chalkboard showing a flow chart.  first, a pair of bare feet captioned with “curiosity”; second, a pair of floating talking heads captioned with “conversation”; third, a pair of hands putting a shoe on a foot captioned with “action”; last, a kid wearing the shoes captioned with “change”.]

iced-chai:

Today is One Day Without Shoes, in which individuals go without shoes “so kids don’t have to.”

Classic opt-out activism, focusing on “raising awareness,” exploiting the appeal of children as compared to adults/individuals in general, and general vagueness (Fact Number One: “Growing up without shoes/In many developing countries, children must walk barefoot for miles to school, clean water & medical help.” From this link, which is a PDF file.)

This article does a great job summarizing the problems with TOMS shoes, the organization behind One Day Without Shoes—which is really just a marketing ploy rather than an awareness raising campaign.

This is another great article, linked to the above one.

(via so-treu)

{ Your absolutely free advice for the day: }

meloukhia:

The response to a marginalised person who says ‘I experience oppression in a movement that supposedly includes me’ should never be ‘no you don’t, you’re lying.’

(Source: se-smith, via summoner-controller-kel-deactiv)

{ Yes We Dusty Womminz Will ALWAYS Be Grumbling }

jaded16india:

There are days like today when I see western feminism fail and I want to rage so much and actually physically smash something.Then two minutes pass, I sigh and just feel the seasonal sads descending on me all over again.

I understand that this comes from a space of wanting to *do* something and is probably “well-intentioned” — as usual I don’t give a shit about anyone’s intentions.

The thing is — NO, you can’t do anything about it. I’m not going to speak of the Congo, or people over there — it’s not my space nor privilege. I can definitely talk about State-sanctioned gender violence that is funded and perpetuated here too by the US and EU —  of gender violence carried out specifically by the military on Dalit people — never without direct and/or indirect aid by the West in whichever form it comes, I’m sorry you can’t ask *your* representatives to intervene and ‘change’ anything. Because an ‘intervention’ when done by western feminists is almost always done to suit your needs, your languages, your purpose, your philanthropy.

At the center we get asked “how come you don’t report these crimes?” and we have to explain to them the military is perpetuating the crime — but this isn’t a verbal conversation — like they can even hear us, remember that Subaltern not being able to speak thing? Spivak was right all along — money, presentations, time, paperwork is spent in trying to sort through cultural codes. ‘Intervention’ isn’t an option — because an ‘intervention’ is a forced entry that expects us to ‘heal’ according to your standards — there are people who ask us if we’d like the money to make a stay-in room when all we ask for is medical supplies — these women can’t leave their homes or children for their reasons, but western feminists cannot accept them.

Philanthropy, activism — whatever you want to call it — isn’t sustainable if you’re still asking people who are perpetuating genocide for help. Is it so difficult to find local institutions in [x] region you’re trying to help?

(via jhameia)

{ I would like an infinite supply of stickers }

areyouseriouschagall:

that say “not everyone who gets pregnant is a woman.”

I’m getting tired of typing it out each goddamn time I reblog something otherwise totally badass and pro-choice.

It’s not whining. It’s not even just frustration about getting erased. It’s the legitimate fear that we won’t be able to get an abortion or escape to a woman’s shelter or be believed when we disclose that we’ve been raped.

Listen. It’s not trivial. And when you pretend that we don’t fucking exist, you’re encouraging our fucking endangerment and persecution.

By erasing trans* people as part of your pro-choice, anti-rape, feminist activism you are going out of your way to make a statement in favor of denying us our rights and excusing violence against us. In what universe am I not supposed to take that personally?

(Source: upwardtrajectorylifechoicesblog, via juthikaforpresident-deactivated)

“PETA is an unbearably misogynistic, classist, ableist piece of shit organism that has stained veganism with their outrageous antics in the name of spreading a moral system that, even to a vegan like me, generally makes no sense.
Anyway, their advertising exploits women, they ignore the fact that some people literally cannot eat a vegan diet, and they assume that every one has access to the food necessary to be a “healthy” vegan. (Newsflash: they don’t.)”

Mark (via sweetcalamity) They’ve also compared slaughterhouses to slavery, so you know. The list goes on and on. (via strikematchlightfiyah)

(via juthikaforpresident-deactivated)

{ LINK: Slut Walk: To march or not to march }

sheresists:

Perhaps a more nuanced understanding of the Slut Walk debate. Again, I’m a little exhausted with this conversation but I think Harsha makes some good points about a highly contentious issue (though, I feel like I’m less forgiving of Slut Walk than Harsha is). I think the article highlights the many ways in which Slut Walk is problematic and alienating to marginalized folks while discussing the positive aspects of participating in the event and how many of the marchers were able to incorporate their own identities into the march. However, the defensiveness and the privilege denial of many of the organizers still does not impress me. And again, though I recognize that many folks reclaimed that space for themselves and were able to find something that is important to them, it’s still shitty that it’s always marginalized folks making that space within a framework that still considers their intersectional experiences as secondary (basically, doing the work). Idk, maybe I’m too cynical. 

(Source: mytongueisforked)

{ LINK: this ain't livin': The Best Advocacy is Self Advocacy: The Dangers of Speaking for Others }

People who position themselves as authorities and use that position to speak for others are not exactly breaking down oppressive systems. They are reinforcing them. They are making it that much harder for us to self advocate. I am painfully aware that there are nondisabled people who talk about disability much more nicely than I do; that some of those very same people even water down my words and ideas and repackage them, without credit, and receive accolades for doing so from ‘allies’ who want to say that they care about disability, but do not want to engage with actual disabled people.

(Source: se-smith, via sanaa-tamir-is-leaving-deactiva)

radicallyhottoff:

in many ways, I’m simply not impressed by white women declaring they won’t see THe Help. I mean, some people I’ve read are operating from a radical space where they are choosing to support work by people of color instead—and I can respect that shit because 1. artists of color need way more support than white artists do and 2. it shows a basic knowledge of the art being produced by artists of color.

but white women just deciding—ZOMG, I heard it’s so forever racist i’ll never see it!!!—and that is that—are lazy at best and harmful at worst. as intellectuals/artists you have an obligation to know what your community is creating so that you can create an honest critique of that work and have your own work go in different directions. you have an obligation as an activist to *engage* those scads of white women who willingly ran to the movie/bought the book and now don’t really see what the problem is. You have an obligation to *contextualize* your own place and your own role within a type of womanhood that was created in support of white supremacy and actively works to uphold white supremacy on almost every level.

I don’t have much respect for intellectuals/artists that are now relying on the *work* of intellectuals/artists of color to declare you’ll never ever see the movie (i.e. using their work to make yourself look mighty anti-racist), rather than seeing the damn movie and *engaging* that work in the context of work by artists of color such that white audiences/women can be taken through a step by step unfolding of gender/race/class/nationalism so that artists of color *don’t have to*.

It is not an act of solidarity to not go see the movie, as to my knowledge, nobody is calling for a boycott. As such, for most of the people currently declaring they won’t see the movie, those declarations function as a way of distancing themselves from the stench of racism—rather than as a way to *undo* the racism itself.

i was being just that lazy/harmful, but after reading this i agree with you on every point.  will try to do this now.

(via butterfacebooger-deactivated201)

“A young man, Jeffrey Lichtenstein, who is a part of Occupy Memphis wrote a beautiful anti-racist position paper on the organization. It was hard-hitting, and made serious points, none of which they intend to consider. They removed his comments off the FaceBook page of Occupy Memphis, and then somebody came along for good measure and removed my responses off of his FB page. This shows the amount of fear and hatred there is within this movement, and within the white Left generally. They simply cannot honestly deal with their internal racism, and will now engage in censorship against other activists. This show why racism has to be overthrown through ideological and political struggle, it can never be voluntarily defeated without a struggle.

This whole fight with Occupy Memphis shows us to what extent that it is really difficult for oppressed POC’s and whites activists to work together on a principled basis, in this the most dynamic struggle in decades, the OWS, but has the same Achilles heel as previous coalitions over the years in America:, internal racism and domination, which relegates peoples of color to the to the activist ghetto. It needs to be said again, that there is not going to be a revolution which does not include Blacks not just taking equal part, but in the front ranks with their struggles taking center stage. This society is based on slavery and the exploitation of the labor, land theft, and mass murder of POC: Indigenous, African, and other oppressed peoples. Capitalism got its very start in America from slavery, but these folks try to pretend that is not the case, and this is just the movement of the white working class. We need to reject racism and censorship by the Left, not just the state or corporations.”

Lorenzo Kom’boa Ervin - (via facebook)

(Source: unpoliceyourmind, via rematiration-deactivated2013111)